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Economic Cooperation In Turkish Culture: Public Goods Games And Lonely Elephants

Author

Listed:
  • Benjamin Beranek

    (Department of Economics, Izmir University of Economics)

  • Alper Duman

    () (Department of Economics, Izmir University of Economics)

Abstract

While the public good experiment has been used to analyze cooperation among various groups in Western Europe and North America, it has not been extensively used in other contexts such as Turkey. This project seeks to rectify that and explore how Turkish university students informally self govern. By employing the public good experiment among a cohort of students attending universities in Ýzmir, Turkey and Adýyaman, Turkey, we hope to quantitatively analyze the factors which lead to altruistic punishment, to antisocial punishment, and ultimately to enhanced cooperation in Turkish society.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Beranek & Alper Duman, 2010. "Economic Cooperation In Turkish Culture: Public Goods Games And Lonely Elephants," Working Papers 1004, Izmir University of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:izm:wpaper:1004
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    File URL: http://eco.ieu.edu.tr/wp-content/wp1004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cooperation; Free Riding; Altruism; Punishment; Trust; Experimental Economics; Public Good Experiments;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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