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Income, Democracy, and Critical Junctures

  • Cervellati, Matteo

    ()

    (University of Bologna)

  • Jung, Florian

    ()

    (University of St. Gallen)

  • Sunde, Uwe

    ()

    (University of Munich)

  • Vischer, Thomas

    ()

    (University of Munich)

Acemoglu, Johnson, Robinson, and Yared (2008) document that the cross-country correlation between income per capita and democracy disappears once including country fixed effects. This paper tests the hypothesis that the effect of income on democracy might differ systematically across countries. A replication of the estimation in a less restrictive empirical framework provides evidence for significant but heterogeneous effects of income on democracy for former colonies and non-colonies, as well as within the sample of former colonies. These heterogeneous effects are related to colonial history and early institutions, and are robust to the use of alternative data and estimation techniques.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7069.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7069
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  1. Robert J. Barro, 1999. "Determinants of Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages S158-S183, December.
  2. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
  3. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521855266 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Quamrul Ashraf & Oded Galor, 2010. "Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch," Department of Economics Working Papers 2010-01, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jul 2010.
  5. Graziella Bertocchi & Andrea Guerzoni, 2010. "Growth, History, or Institutions? What Explains State Fragility in Sub-Saharan Africa," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 044, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
  6. Giovanni S. F. Bruno, 2005. "Estimation and inference in dynamic unbalanced panel-data models with a small number of individuals," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 5(4), pages 473-500, December.
  7. David Roodman, 2007. "A Note on the Theme of Too Many Instruments," Working Papers 125, Center for Global Development.
  8. Blundell, R. & Bond, S., 1995. "Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Economics Papers 104, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  9. Jess Benhabib & Alejandro Corvalan & Mark M. Spiegel, 2011. "Reestablishing the Income-Democracy Nexus," NBER Working Papers 16832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. José Cheibub & Jennifer Gandhi & James Vreeland, 2010. "Democracy and dictatorship revisited," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 67-101, April.
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