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The Civil Rights Act and the Earnings of Lower Income Hispanic Men in the 1960's

Author

Listed:
  • Duleep, Harriet

    () (College of William and Mary)

  • Regets, Mark

    () (National Foundation for American Policy)

Abstract

This paper uses Social Security longitudinal earnings records matched to Current Population Survey data to examine changes in the relative earnings of Hispanic men during a period of dramatic change in public and private policies toward race and ethnicity characterized by, but not limited to, the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Our principle focus is to compare and contrast how lower income Hispanic and African-American men fared during the civil rights era relative to lower-income non-Hispanic whites. Although previous studies have analyzed black economic progress using annual data before and after the Civil Rights Act, this is the first study to do so for Hispanics. We follow a longitudinal sample of individuals who were in the labor market before and after the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Following the same individuals holds constant an array of unmeasured variables such as labor force selectivity and schooling quality that may correlate with the post-1964 period; our approach addresses concerns that the results are the product of changes in these variables. Of particular note – we uncover a significant acceleration following the Civil Rights Act in the relative earnings of low-income Hispanic men.

Suggested Citation

  • Duleep, Harriet & Regets, Mark, 2012. "The Civil Rights Act and the Earnings of Lower Income Hispanic Men in the 1960's," IZA Discussion Papers 6638, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6638
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    Cited by:

    1. Harriet Orcutt Duleep & Seth Sanders, 2013. "The Economic Status of Asian Americans Before and After the Civil Rights Act," Working Papers 135, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    anti-discrimination legislation; minority economic progress; Mexican Americans; Hispanic; low income; Civil Rights Act; longitudinal administrative records;

    JEL classification:

    • J48 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Particular Labor Markets; Public Policy
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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