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Time-Bound Opportunity Costs of Informal Care: Consequences for Access to Professional Care, Caregiver Support, and Labour Supply Estimates

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  • Hassink, Wolter

    () (Utrecht University)

  • van den Berg, Bernard

    () (University of York)

Abstract

Patterns of informal care are documented throughout the day with Dutch time use diary data. The diary data enable us to identify a, so far overlooked, source of opportunity costs of informal care, i.e. the necessity to perform particular tasks of informal care at specific moments of the day. Some care tasks are relatively unshiftable, while other tasks are shiftable implying that they can be performed at other moments of the day or even on different days. In particular, household and organization activities seem to be shiftable for employed caregivers, while personal care seems to contain unshiftable activities. This implies an additional opportunity cost of providing personal care tasks. As the care recipient’s need for care may be related to the possibility to shift informal care throughout the day, we conclude that one should be careful with using care need as an instrument of informal care in labour supply equations.

Suggested Citation

  • Hassink, Wolter & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Time-Bound Opportunity Costs of Informal Care: Consequences for Access to Professional Care, Caregiver Support, and Labour Supply Estimates," IZA Discussion Papers 5433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5433
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Coe, Norma B. & Skira, Meghan M., 2013. "The effect of informal care on work and wages," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 240-252.
    2. D.S. Possenriede & W.H.J. Hassink & J. Plantenga, 2014. "Does temporal and locational flexibility of work reduce absenteeism?," Working Papers 14-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    3. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Connelly, Luke Brian, 2014. "The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 115-122.
    4. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Lilly, Meredith B. & Ng, Carita & Coyte, Peter C., 2013. "The fiscal impact of informal caregiving to home care recipients in Canada: How the intensity of care influences costs and benefits to government," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 102-109.
    5. Geyer, J.; Korfhage, T.;, 2017. "Long-term care reform and the labor supply of informal caregivers – evidence from a quasi-experiment," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. van den Berg, Bernard & Fiebig, Denzil G. & Hall, Jane, 2014. "Well-being losses due to care-giving," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 123-131.
    7. Daniel Possenriede & Wolter Hassink & Janneke Plantenga, 2014. "Does temporal and locational flexibility of work increase the labour supply of part-timers?," Working Papers 14-11, Utrecht School of Economics.
    8. Manuel, Ruiz-Adame Reina & M. Carmen, González-Camacho & Alfredo Mainar-Causapé, 2015. "An analysis of caregiver profile and its impact on employment situation: primary caregivers of patients of Alzheimer´s and other dementias in the South Western of Spain," Economic Analysis Working Papers (2002-2010). Atlantic Review of Economics (2011-2016), Colexio de Economistas de A Coruña, Spain and Fundación Una Galicia Moderna, vol. 1, pages 1-1, December.
    9. Bauer, Jan Michael & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2015. "Impacts of Informal Caregiving on Caregiver Employment, Health, and Family," IZA Discussion Papers 8851, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Ciani, Emanuele, 2012. "Informal adult care and caregivers' employment in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 155-164.
    11. Michio Yuda & Jinkook Lee, 2016. "Effects of Informal Caregivers' Health on Care Recipients," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 192-210, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    paid work; informal care; opportunity cost; use of time; labor supply; joint production;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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