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Socio-Economic Inequalities in Tobacco Consumption of the Older Adults in China: A Decomposition Method

Author

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  • Si, Yafei

    (University of New South Wales)

  • Zhou, Zhongliang

    (Xi’an Jiaotong University)

  • Su, Min

    (Inner Mongolia University)

  • Wang, Xiao

    (Carnegie Mellon University)

  • Li, Dan

    (Xi’an Jiaotong University)

  • Wang, Dan

    (Xi’an Jiaotong University)

  • He, Shuyi

    (Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University)

  • Hong, Zihan

    (Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University)

  • Chen, Xi

    (Yale University)

Abstract

In China, tobacco consumption is a leading risk factor for non-communicable diseases, and understanding the pattern of socio-economic inequalities of tobacco consumption will, thus, help to develop targeted policies of public health control. Data came from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study in 2013, involving 17,663 respondents aged 45 and above. Tobacco use prevalence and tobacco use quantities were defined for further analysis. Using the concentration index (CI) and its decomposition, socio-economic inequalities of tobacco consumption grouped by gender were estimated. The concentration index of tobacco use prevalence was 0.044 (men 0.041; women −0.039). The concentration index of tobacco use quantities among smokers was 0.039 (men 0.033; women 0.038). The majority of the inequality could be explained by educational attainment, age, area, and economic quantiles. Tobacco consumption was more common among richer compared to poorer people in China. Gender, educational attainments, age, areas, and economic quantiles were strong predictors of tobacco consumption in China. Public health policies need to be targeted towards men in higher economic quantiles with lower educational attainment, and divorced or widowed women, especially in urban areas of China.

Suggested Citation

  • Si, Yafei & Zhou, Zhongliang & Su, Min & Wang, Xiao & Li, Dan & Wang, Dan & He, Shuyi & Hong, Zihan & Chen, Xi, 2018. "Socio-Economic Inequalities in Tobacco Consumption of the Older Adults in China: A Decomposition Method," IZA Discussion Papers 11708, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11708
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    Cited by:

    1. Chengbo Li & Chun Long & Mei Zhang & Luyu Zhang & Mengyao Liu & Meiqi Song & Yunfei Cheng & Gong Chen, 2022. "The Influence of Alcohol Consumption on Tobacco Use among Urban Older Adults: Evidence from Western China in 2017," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(13), pages 1-14, June.
    2. Nigar Nargis & Rong Zheng & Steve S. Xu & Geoffrey T. Fong & Guoze Feng & Yuan Jiang & Yang Wang & Xiao Hu, 2019. "Cigarette Affordability in China, 2006–2015: Findings from International Tobacco Control China Surveys," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 16(7), pages 1-21, April.
    3. Han Hu & Yafei Si & Bingqin Li, 2020. "Decomposing Inequality in Long-Term Care Need Among Older Adults with Chronic Diseases in China: A Life Course Perspective," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 17(7), pages 1-14, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    tobacco consumption; inequality; concentration index; decomposition; China;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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