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In-Work Poverty in the United States

Listed author(s):
  • Kenworthy, Lane

    (University of California, San Diego)

  • Marx, Ive

    ()

    (University of Antwerp)

Registered author(s):

In-work poverty became a prominent policy issue in the United States long before the term itself acquired any meaning and relevance in other industrialized countries. With America's embrace of an employment-centered antipoverty strategy, the working poor have become even more of an issue. This paper reviews some key trends, drivers and policy issues. How much in-work poverty is there in the United States? How does the US compare to other rich democracies? Has America's in-work poverty rate changed over time? Who are the in-work poor? What are the main drivers of levels and changes in in-work poverty? Finally, what are the prospects for America's working poor going forward?

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp10638.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 10638.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2017
Publication status: Forthcoming in Lohmann, H. and I. Marx (eds) Handbook of Research on In-Work Poverty, Edward Elgar
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10638
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Henning Lohmann, 2008. "Welfare States, Labour Market Institutions and the Working Poor: A Comparative Analysis of 20 European Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 776, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Jeffrey Grogger, 2003. "The Effects of Time Limits, the EITC, and Other Policy Changes on Welfare Use, Work, and Income among Female-Headed Families," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 394-408, May.
  3. Blank Rebecca M, 2006. "Was Welfare Reform Successful?," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 3(4), pages 1-5, March.
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  6. Stephanie Riegg Cellini & Signe-Mary McKernan & Caroline Ratcliffe, 2008. "The dynamics of poverty in the United States: A review of data, methods, and findings," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 577-605.
  7. Hilary W. Hoynes & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens, 2006. "Poverty in America: Trends and Explanations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 47-68, Winter.
  8. David H. Autor, 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
  9. David T. Ellwood, 2000. "Anti-Poverty Policy for Families in the Next Century: From Welfare to Work--and Worries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 187-198, Winter.
  10. Zachary Parolin, 2016. "The Sum of Its Parts? Assessing Variation and Trends in Family Income Support Across the 48 Contiguous United States," Working Papers 1605, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  11. Marchal, Sarah & Marx, Ive, 2015. "Stemming the Tide: What Have EU Countries Done to Support Low-Wage Workers in an Era of Downward Wage Pressures?," IZA Discussion Papers 9390, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  13. Sandra K. Danziger & Sheldon Danziger & Kristin S. Seefeldt & H. Luke Shaefer, 2016. "From Welfare To A Work‐Based Safety Net: An Incomplete Transition," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(1), pages 231-238, 01.
  14. Ron Haskins, 2016. "Tanf At Age 20: Work Still Works," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(1), pages 224-231, 01.
  15. Jesse Rothstein, 2010. "Is the EITC as Good as an NIT? Conditional Cash Transfers and Tax Incidence," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 177-208, February.
  16. Lane Kenworthy, 2015. "Do employment-conditional earnings subsidies work?," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/10, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  17. Eissa, Nada & Hoynes, Hilary Williamson, 2004. "Taxes and the labor market participation of married couples: the earned income tax credit," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 1931-1958, August.
  18. David Brady & Jennifer Moren Cross & Andrew Fullerton, 2010. "More than Just Nickels and Dimes: A Cross-National Analysis of Working Poverty in Affluent Democracies," LIS Working papers 545, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
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