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Quantitative Easing and the Labor Market in Japan

Listed author(s):
  • Chun-Hung Kuo

    (International Univeristy of Japan)

  • Hiroaki Miyamoto

    (The University of Tokyo)

This paper studies the effectiveness of unconventional monetary policy on the labor market. By using the Japan's data, we estimate structural vector autoregressive models. Our empirical analysis demonstrates that while unconventional monetary policy boosts output and employment significantly, its effects on inflation and nominal wages are limited.

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File URL: http://www.iuj.ac.jp/workingpapers/index.cfm?File=EMS_2016_02.pdf
File Function: First version, 2016
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Research Institute, International University of Japan in its series Working Papers with number EMS_2016_02.

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Length: 9 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2016
Handle: RePEc:iuj:wpaper:ems_2016_02
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  1. Christopher A. Sims, 1986. "Are forecasting models usable for policy analysis?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 2-16.
  2. Fujiwara, Ippei, 2006. "Evaluating monetary policy when nominal interest rates are almost zero," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 434-453, September.
  3. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
  4. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-921, September.
  5. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
  6. Yuzo Honda, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Nontraditional Monetary Policy: The Case of Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(1), pages 1-23, 03.
  7. Ugo Fasano-Filho & Qing Wang & Pelin Berkmen, 2012. "Bank of Japan's Quantitative and Credit Easing; Are they Now More Effective," IMF Working Papers 12/2, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Takatoshi Ito, 2014. "We Are All QE-sians Now," IMES Discussion Paper Series 14-E-07, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  9. Hiroshi Ugai, 2006. "Effects of the Quantitative Easing Policy: A Survey of Empirical Analyses," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 06-E-10, Bank of Japan.
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