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The Relative Importance of Aggregate and Disaggregate Shocks in Korean Business Cycles

  • Kang, Gi Choon
  • Orazem, Peter

This study examines the role of aggregate and disaggregate shocks in a small open economy, Korea. Variation in the growth rates of industrial output is decomposed into portions attributable to aggregate, industry group, and sector-specific shocks. Although all types of shocks play a role, sectoral shocks are the dominant source of sectoral output fluctuations. While aggregate shocks are a significant source of sectoral and aggregate output fluctuations, they are no more important than in large industrialized economies that have been studied previously. Consequently, small open economies may not be any more susceptible to aggregate disturbances than are the G-7 countries.

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Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 10351.

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Date of creation: 01 Jun 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Asian Economics, June 2003, vol. 14 no. 3, pp. 419-434
Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10351
Contact details of provider: Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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  1. Altonji, Joseph G & Ham, John C, 1990. "Variation in Employment Growth in Canada: The Role of External, National, Regional, and Industrial Factors," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages S198-236, January.
  2. Long, John B, Jr & Plosser, Charles I, 1983. "Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(1), pages 39-69, February.
  3. Reva Krieger, 1989. "Sectoral and aggregate shocks to industrial output in Germany, Japan and Canada," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 75, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Norrbin, Stefan C. & Schlagenhauf, Don E., 1996. "The role of international factors in the business cycle: A multi-country study," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1-2), pages 85-104, February.
  5. Stockman, Alan C., 1988. "Sectoral and national aggregate disturbances to industrial output in seven European countries," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 387-409.
  6. Norrbin, Stefan C. & Schlagenhauf, Don E., 1988. "An inquiry into the sources of macroeconomic fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 43-70, July.
  7. Long, John B, Jr & Plosser, Charles I, 1987. "Sectoral vs. Aggregate Shocks in the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 333-36, May.
  8. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
  9. Norrbin, Stefan C & Schlagenhauf, Don E, 1991. "The Importance of Sectoral and Aggregate Shocks in Business Cycles," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(2), pages 317-35, April.
  10. Norrbin, Stefan C. & Schlagenhauf, Don E., 1990. "Sources of output fluctuations in the United States during the inter-war and post-war years," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 14(3-4), pages 523-551, October.
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