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Variation in Employment Growth in Canada: The Role of External, National, Regional, and Industrial Factors

  • Altonji, Joseph G
  • Ham, John C

This article investigates the effect of external, national, and sectoral shocks on Canadian employment fluctuations at the national, industrial, and provincial levels. The authors assume that employment growth in each industry-province pair depends on U.S. growth; lagged Canadian growth at the national, industrial, and provincial levels; an aggregate shock; and shocks specific to each industry, province, and industry-province pair. They estimate that the U.S. and Canadian shocks account for two-thirds and a quarter, respectively, of aggregate variation. Sectoral shocks account for only one-tenth of aggregate variation, but represent 30 percent of the variation from Canadian sources. Copyright 1990 by University of Chicago Press.

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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 8 (1990)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: S198-236

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:8:y:1990:i:1:p:s198-236
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