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Program evaluation and ethnic differences: the Pension 65 program in Peru

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  • DECANCQ Koen
  • OLIVERA Javier
  • SCHOKKAERT Erik

Abstract

We show that the introduction of a non-contributory pension program (Pension 65) in Peru had remarkably different effects for its three main ethnic groups, i.e., Mestizo, Quechua, and Aymara. The Aymara beneficiaries of the program have experienced larger increases in health and life satisfaction compared to other Peruvians. Using a panel life satisfaction regression, we find evidence for preference heterogeneity between the Aymara and the other ethnic groups that is consistent with the observed differences. Finally, we turn to the question of how the pension program can be evaluated in a robust manner while respecting the preference heterogeneity between the ethnic groups. We propose the natural criterion that a program benefits a recipient if she is lifted to a higher indifference curve. We show that the pension program was beneficial for all groups, but that more Aymara beneficiaries were lifted to a higher indifference curve compared to other Peruvians. Our proposed criterion can be useful to evaluate programs in all cases where preference differences matter.

Suggested Citation

  • DECANCQ Koen & OLIVERA Javier & SCHOKKAERT Erik, 2018. "Program evaluation and ethnic differences: the Pension 65 program in Peru," LISER Working Paper Series 2018-21, LISER.
  • Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2018-21
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Program Evaluation; Ethnicity; Preferences; Pensions; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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