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Private supplemental health insurance: retirees' demand


  • Carine Franc

    () (CERMES centre de recherche medecine, sciences, sante et societe)

  • Marc Perronnin

    () (IRDES institut for research and information in health economics)

  • Aurelie Pierre

    () (IRDES institut for research and information in health economics)


In France, private health insurance, that supplements public health insurance, is essential for access to health care. About 90% of the population is covered by a private contract and around half of them obtain their coverage through their employer. Considering the financial benefits associated with group contracts compared to individual contracts, we assume that the switching behaviors vary among different beneficiaries during the transition to retirement. Indeed, despite a 1989 law, the gap in premiums increases at retirement between group and individual contracts affords the opportunity to study the marginal price effect on switching behaviors. In this study, we consider the nature of the contract prior to retirement (compulsory or voluntary membership group contract and individual contract) as an indirect measure of the price effect. We focus on its role and check for a large number of individual characteristics that may influence the new retirees' health insurance demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Carine Franc & Marc Perronnin & Aurelie Pierre, 2008. "Private supplemental health insurance: retirees' demand," Working Papers DT9, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Apr 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:irh:wpaper:dt9

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marquis, M Susan & Phelps, Charles E, 1987. "Price Elasticity and Adverse Selection in the Demand for Supplementary Health Insurance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(2), pages 299-313, April.
    2. Samuelson, William & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1988. "Status Quo Bias in Decision Making," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 7-59, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Or, Zeynep & Cases, Chantal & Lisac, Melanie & Vrangbæk, Karsten & Winblad, Ulrika & Bevan, Gwyn, 2010. "Are health problems systemic? Politics of access and choice under Beveridge and Bismarck systems," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(03), pages 269-293, July.

    More about this item


    private health insurance; retirement; switching behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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