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Redistributive Taxation, Incentives, and the Intertemporal Evolution of Human Capital

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  • Christian Ferreda
  • Matías Tapia

Abstract

This paper contributes to the literature on redistributive taxation and human capital dynamics by explicitly analyzing the role of incentives in the education market where human capital is produced. We introduce an explicit education market with heterogeneous private schools in a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model with overlapping generations and human capital accumulation. We use the model to simulate the effects of taxation on growth, intergenerational mobility, inequality, and welfare. Equalization in education expenditures reduces incentives for differentiation in the education market, with the distribution of education investments shifting towards the least productive schools. This has significant consequences on equilibrium outcomes, and highlights the importance of incorporating the role of intermediation when analyzing redistribution policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Ferreda & Matías Tapia, 2010. "Redistributive Taxation, Incentives, and the Intertemporal Evolution of Human Capital," Documentos de Trabajo 390, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  • Handle: RePEc:ioe:doctra:390
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    File URL: http://www.economia.uc.cl/docs/dt_390.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital; school market; redistributive taxation; inequality; efficiency;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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