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Revenue Implications of Destination-Based Cash-Flow Taxation

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  • Mr. Alexander D Klemm
  • Mr. Shafik Hebous
  • Saila Stausholm

Abstract

We estimate the revenue implications of a Destination Based Cash Flow Tax (DBCFT) for 80 countries. On a global average, DBCFT revenues under unchanged tax rates would remain similar to the existing corporate income tax (CIT) revenue, but with sizable redistribution of revenue across countries. Countries are more likely to gain revenue if they have trade deficits, are not reliant on the resource sector, and/or—perhaps surprisingly—are developing economies. DBCFT revenues tend to be more volatile than CIT revenues. Moreover, we consider the revenue losses resulting from spillovers in case of unilateral implementation of a DBCFT. Results suggest that these spillover effects are sizeable if the adopting country is large and globally integrated. These spillovers generate strong revenue-based incentives for many—but not all—other countries to follow the DBCFT adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Mr. Alexander D Klemm & Mr. Shafik Hebous & Saila Stausholm, 2019. "Revenue Implications of Destination-Based Cash-Flow Taxation," IMF Working Papers 2019/007, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:2019/007
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    Cited by:

    1. Shafik Hebous & Alexander Klemm, 2020. "A destination-based allowance for corporate equity," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(3), pages 753-777, June.
    2. Thomas A., Gresik & Schjelderup, Guttorm, 2022. "Tax induced transfer pricing under universal adoption of the destination-based cash-flow tax," Discussion Papers 2022/8, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Business and Management Science.
    3. Khanindra Ch. Das, 2022. "Profit-shifting behaviour of emerging multinationals from India," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2022-21, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Carpentieri, Loredana & Micossi, Stefano & Parascandolo, Paola, 2019. "Overhauling corporate taxation in the digital economy," CEPS Papers 25090, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    5. Johannes Becker & Joachim Englisch, 2020. "Unilateral introduction of destination-based cash-flow taxation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(3), pages 495-513, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    WP; revenue loss; trade deficit; revenue estimate; Tax Revenue; Destination-Based Cash Flow Tax; Border Adjustment Tax; DBCFT country; profit shifting; DBCFT revenue; DBCFT adoption; DBCFT base; loss-making firm; Value-added tax; Corporate income tax; Trade balance; Trade surpluses; Global;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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