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Cash Flow Taxes in an Open Economy


  • Bond, Stephen Roy
  • Devereux, Michael P.


Academic and policy debates generally consider levying tax on corporate profit on either a residence basis or on a source basis. We explore two alternatives, based on the location of consumption, rather than production – destination-based, as opposed to source-based or residence-based, taxes. We analyse the properties of these taxes, especially with respect to their impact on location decisions and domestic welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Bond, Stephen Roy & Devereux, Michael P., 2002. "Cash Flow Taxes in an Open Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 3401, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3401

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Harry Grubert & T. Scott Newlon, 1997. "Taxing Consumption in a Global Economy," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 52737, September.
    7. Ignatius J. Horstmann & James R. Markusen, 1990. "Endogenous Market Structures in International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    9. Gordon, Roger H, 1986. "Taxation of Investment and Savings in a World Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1086-1102, December.
    10. Zodrow, George R. & Mieszkowski, Peter, 1986. "Pigou, Tiebout, property taxation, and the underprovision of local public goods," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 356-370, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael P. Devereux & Peter Birch Sørensen, 2006. "The Corporate Income Tax: international trends and options for fundamental reform," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 264, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    2. Devereux, Michael P., 2012. "Issues in the Design of Taxes on Corporate Profit," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 65(3), pages 709-730, September.
    3. Michael Devereux, 2004. "Debating Proposed Reforms of the Taxation of Corporate Income in the European Union," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 11(1), pages 71-89, January.
    4. Peter Birch Sørensen, 2006. "Can Capital Income Taxes Survive? And Should They?," EPRU Working Paper Series 06-06, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    5. Sijbren Cnossen, 2016. "Tackling Spillovers by Taxing Corporate Income in the European Union at Source," CESifo Working Paper Series 5790, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Fuest, Clemens & Spengel, Christoph & Finke, Katharina & Heckemeyer, Jost H. & Nusser, Hannah, 2013. "Profit shifting and 'aggressive' tax planning by multinational firms: Issues and options for reform," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-078, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Michael P. Devereux, 2008. "Taxation of outbound direct investment: economic principles and tax policy considerations," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 698-719, winter.
    8. Deborah Knirsch & Rainer Niemann, 2008. "Deferred Shareholder Taxation -- Implementing a Neutral Business Tax in the European Union," Accounting in Europe, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 101-125, December.
    9. Auerbach, Alan J. & Devereux, Michael P., 2010. "Consumption and cash-flow taxes in an International setting," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58056, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Alan Auerbach & Michael P. Devereux & Helen Simpson, 2007. "Taxing Corporate Income," CESifo Working Paper Series 2139, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Kari Seppo, 2015. "Corporate tax in an international environment – Problems and possible remedies," Nordic Tax Journal, De Gruyter Open, vol. 2015(1), pages 1-16, September.
    12. McGee, M Kevin, 2017. "The economic distortions of a border-adjusted corporate cash flow tax," MPRA Paper 79275, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Peter Birch Sørensen, 2006. "Can Capital Income Taxes Survive? And Should They?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1793, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Sijbren Cnossen, 2016. "Tackling Spillovers by Taxing Corporate Income in the European Union at Source," CPB Discussion Paper 324, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

    More about this item


    corporation tax; investment; location;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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