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Household Savings and Income Distribution in Mexico

  • Orazio P. Attanasio
  • Miguel Székely

Following the 1994 financial crisis, the rate of saving of the Mexican economy fell from 21. 7 percent to 19. 8 percent of GDP. The decline was associated with a reduction in the rate of external saving from 6. 9 to 0. 5 percent between 1994 and 1995. The overall reduction was not more dramatic because it was almost fully compensated by an increase in private saving from 11. 3 percent to 15 percent of GDP during these years.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4152.

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Date of creation: Dec 1998
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4152
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  1. Angus Deaton & Christina Paxson, 1998. "Saving and growth: another look at the cohort evidence," Working Papers 225, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  2. O. Attanasio & H. W. Hoynes, . "Differential mortality and wealth accumulation," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1079-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  3. Timothy Besley, 1995. "Nonmarket Institutions for Credit and Risk Sharing in Low-Income Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 115-127, Summer.
  4. Suzanne Duryea & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Labor Markets in Latin America: A Supply-Side Story," Research Department Publications 4120, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Orazio Attanasio & James Banks, 1998. "Trends in household saving: a tale of two countries," IFS Working Papers W98/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Richard Blundell & Ian Preston, 1997. "Consumption, inequality and income uncertainty," IFS Working Papers W97/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  7. Orazio Attanasio & James Banks & Costas Meghir & Guglielmo Weber, 1995. "Humps and bumps in lifetime consumption," IFS Working Papers W95/14, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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