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The Household Response to the Mexican Peso Crisis

  • David J. McKenzie

November 2001 Household expenditure surveys are used to examine the effects of the Mexican peso crisis on household consumption and employment. The crisis is seen to have caused income and consumption to decline for all groups of society, although the relative impact differed by the education, industry and residence of the household head. The main smoothing mechanism was a change in the composition of consumption. Households are shown to have increased their expenditure share on certain food items even more than Engel’s law would predict, reducing their expenditure on luxury goods in order to do so. Labour supply is not found to have responded strongly to the crisis. Working Papers Index

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Paper provided by Stanford University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 01017.

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Date of creation: Nov 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wop:stanec:01017
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  1. Martin Browning & Thomas Crossley, . "Shocks, stocks and socks: consumption smoothing and the replacement of durables during an unemployment spell," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 27, McMaster University.
  2. Frankenberg, E. & Thomas, D. & Beegle, K., 1999. "The Real Costs of Indonesia's Economic Crisis: Preliminary Findings from the Indonesia Family Life Surveys," Papers 99-04, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  3. Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys & Salinas, Angel, 2000. "How Mexico's financial crisis affected income distribution," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2406, The World Bank.
  4. Verbeek, M.J.C.M. & Nijman, T.E., 1990. "Can cohort data be treated as genuine panel data?," Discussion Paper 1990-64, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  5. Nijman, T.E. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 1993. "Minimum MSE estimation of a regression model with fixed effects from a series of cross sections," Other publications TiSEM 34c1104a-a64b-4030-be99-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  6. Orazio P. Attanasio & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Household Savings and Income Distribution in Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6449, Inter-American Development Bank.
  7. Verbeek, M. & Nijman, T., 1992. "Minimum MSE Estimatin of a Regression Model with Fixed Effects from a Series of Cross Sections," Papers 9201, Tilburg - Center for Economic Research.
  8. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
  9. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
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