IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/obuest/v68y2006i4p473-495.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Disentangling Age, Cohort and Time Effects in the Additive Model

Author

Listed:
  • David J. McKenzie

Abstract

This paper presents a new approach to the old problem of linear dependency of age, cohort and time effects. It is shown that second differences of the effects can be estimated without any normalization restrictions, providing information on the shape of the age-, cohort- and time-effect profiles, and enabling identification of structural breaks. A Wald test is provided to test the popular linear and quadratic specifications against a very general alternative. The method is illustrated through examples which show its ability to detect structural breaks in time effects as a result of the Mexican peso crisis, and to determine whether the age-effect profile in the variance of Taiwanese log consumption is concave or convex. Copyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • David J. McKenzie, 2006. "Disentangling Age, Cohort and Time Effects in the Additive Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 473-495, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:68:y:2006:i:4:p:473-495
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0084.2006.00173.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David J. McKenzie, 2001. "The Household Response to the Mexican Peso Crisis," Working Papers 01017, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hausman, Jerry A & Taylor, William E, 1981. "Panel Data and Unobservable Individual Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1377-1398, November.
    3. Orazio P. Attanasio, 1998. "Cohort Analysis of Saving Behavior by U.S. Households," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(3), pages 575-609.
    4. Deaton, Angus & Paxson, Christina, 1994. "Intertemporal Choice and Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(3), pages 437-467, June.
    5. Jappelli, Tullio, 1999. "The Age-Wealth Profile and the Life-Cycle Hypothesis: A Cohort Analysis with Time Series of Cross-Sections of Italian Households," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 45(1), pages 57-75, March.
    6. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
    7. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1993. "Minimum MSE estimation of a regression model with fixed effects from a series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 125-136, September.
    8. Dolores Collado, M., 1997. "Estimating dynamic models from time series of independent cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 37-62.
    9. James Heckman & Edward Vytlacil, 2001. "Identifying The Role Of Cognitive Ability In Explaining The Level Of And Change In The Return To Schooling," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 1-12, February.
    10. Denton, Frank T & Mountain, Dean C & Spencer, Byron G, 1999. "Age, Trend, and Cohort Effects in a Macro Model of Canadian Expenditure Patterns," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(4), pages 430-443, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rulof Burger & Rachel Jafta & Dieter von Fintel, 2016. "Affirmative action policies and the evolution of post-apartheid South Africa's racial wage gap," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Sakai, Koji & Uesugi, Iichiro & Watanabe, Tsutomu, 2010. "Firm age and the evolution of borrowing costs: Evidence from Japanese small firms," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1970-1981, August.
    3. Coulson, N. Edward & McMillen, Daniel P., 2008. "Estimating time, age and vintage effects in housing prices," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 138-151, June.
    4. Luiz Mello & Simone Schotte & Erwin R. Tiongson & Hernan Winkler, 2017. "Greying the Budget: Ageing and Preferences over Public Policies," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 70-96, February.
    5. Johannes Geyer & Viktor Steiner, 2010. "Public Pensions, Changing Employment Patterns, and the Impact of Pension Reforms across Birth Cohorts: A Microsimulation Analysis for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 984, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Dieter von Fintel, 2017. "Institutional wage-setting, labour demand and labour supply: Causal estimates from a South African pseudo-panel," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 1-16, January.
    7. repec:bla:scotjp:v:64:y:2017:i:5:p:501-529 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Maruyama, Shiko & Nakamura, Sayaka, 2015. "The decline in BMI among Japanese women after World War II," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 125-138.
    9. Van Landeghem, Bert, 2012. "A test for the convexity of human well-being over the life cycle: Longitudinal evidence from a 20-year panel," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 571-582.
    10. G. C. Lim & Q. Zeng, 2016. "Consumption, Income, and Wealth: Evidence from Age, Cohort, and Period Elasticities," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(3), pages 489-508, September.
    11. Koji Karato & Oleksandr Movshuk & Chihiro Shimizu, 2015. "Semiparametric Model of Hedonic Housing Prices in Japan," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 325-345, December.
    12. repec:eee:joecag:v:9:y:2017:i:c:p:185-207 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Nicolae Garleanu & Leonid Kogan & Stavros Panageas, 2009. "The Demographics of Innovation and Asset Returns," Working Papers 2009-008, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    14. Rulof Burger & Servaas Berg & Dieter Fintel, 2015. "The Unintended Consequences of Education Policies on South African Participation and Unemployment," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(1), pages 74-100, March.
    15. Gregori Baetschmann, 2011. "Heterogeneity in the relationship between happiness and age: Evidence from the German Socio-Economic Panel," ECON - Working Papers 047, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    16. Arpita Chatterjee & Aarti Singh & Tahlee Stone, 2016. "Understanding Wage Inequality in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 348-360, September.
    17. Rulof P Burger & Ronelle Burger & Laura Rossouw, 2012. "The fertility transition in South Africa: A retrospective panel data analysis," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(5), pages 738-755, December.
    18. repec:kap:jrefec:v:56:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11146-016-9596-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:aru:wpaper:201510 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Iqbal A. Syed & Jan De Haan, 2017. "Age, Time, Vintage, And Price Indexes: Measuring The Depreciation Pattern Of Houses," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 580-600, January.
    21. Rubio, Gloria M. & Soloaga, Isidro, 2004. "Assessing the Vulnerability of Agricultural Households to Macroeconomic Shocks: Evidence from Mexico," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 1(1).
    22. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:161-171 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Tilak Abeysinghe & Jiaying Gu, 2010. "The Cultural Revolution, Stress and Cancer," Microeconomics Working Papers 23118, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    24. de Ree, Joppe & Alessie, Rob, 2011. "Life satisfaction and age: Dealing with underidentification in age-period-cohort models," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 177-182, July.
    25. Gârleanu, Nicolae & Kogan, Leonid & Panageas, Stavros, 2012. "Displacement risk and asset returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(3), pages 491-510.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:68:y:2006:i:4:p:473-495. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sfeixuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.