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Disentangling Age, Cohort and Time Effects in the Additive Model

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  • David J. McKenzie

Abstract

This paper presents a new approach to the old problem of linear dependency of age, cohort and time effects. It is shown that second differences of the effects can be estimated without any normalization restrictions, providing information on the shape of the age‐, cohort‐ and time‐effect profiles, and enabling identification of structural breaks. A Wald test is provided to test the popular linear and quadratic specifications against a very general alternative. The method is illustrated through examples which show its ability to detect structural breaks in time effects as a result of the Mexican peso crisis, and to determine whether the age‐effect profile in the variance of Taiwanese log consumption is concave or convex.

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  • David J. McKenzie, 2006. "Disentangling Age, Cohort and Time Effects in the Additive Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 473-495, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:68:y:2006:i:4:p:473-495
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0084.2006.00173.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David J. McKenzie, 2001. "The Household Response to the Mexican Peso Crisis," Working Papers 01017, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hausman, Jerry A & Taylor, William E, 1981. "Panel Data and Unobservable Individual Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1377-1398, November.
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    6. Deaton, Angus & Paxson, Christina, 1994. "Intertemporal Choice and Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(3), pages 437-467, June.
    7. Orazio P. Attanasio, 1998. "Cohort Analysis of Saving Behavior by U.S. Households," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(3), pages 575-609.
    8. Tullio Jappelli, 1999. "The Age‐Wealth Profile And The Life‐Cycle Hypothesis: A Cohort Analysis With A Time Series Of Cross‐Sections Of Italian Households," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 45(1), pages 57-75, March.
    9. Dolores Collado, M., 1997. "Estimating dynamic models from time series of independent cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 37-62.
    10. Denton, Frank T & Mountain, Dean C & Spencer, Byron G, 1999. "Age, Trend, and Cohort Effects in a Macro Model of Canadian Expenditure Patterns," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(4), pages 430-443, October.
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