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Learning in economics: the Austrian insights

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  • Pierre Garrouste

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Abstract

In this contribution I first present a selective review of the literature on learning theories in economics. I then show that those theories are often assimilating knowledge to information or considering knowledge as a structure of information. Finally I discuss the possibility for those theories to be defined as Austrian and I conclude with a presentation of a research agenda.

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  • Pierre Garrouste, 2001. "Learning in economics: the Austrian insights," ICER Working Papers 25-2001, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:icr:wpicer:25-2001
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    File URL: http://www.biblioecon.unito.it/biblioservizi/RePEc/icr/wp2001/garrouste25-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giovanni Dosi & Luigi Marengo & Giorgio Fagiolo, 1996. "Learning in evolutionary environment," CEEL Working Papers 9605, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    2. Fudenberg, Drew & Levine, David, 1998. "Learning in games," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 631-639, May.
    3. Erev, Ido & Roth, Alvin E, 1998. "Predicting How People Play Games: Reinforcement Learning in Experimental Games with Unique, Mixed Strategy Equilibria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(4), pages 848-881, September.
    4. Rabin, Matthew, 1994. "Cognitive dissonance and social change," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-194, March.
    5. Young, H Peyton, 1993. "The Evolution of Conventions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 57-84, January.
    6. Dulbecco, Philippe & Garrouste, Pierre, 1999. "Towards an Austrian Theory of the Firm," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 43-64.
    7. Richard Langlois & Pierre Garrouste, 1997. "Cognition, Redundancy, And Learning In Organizations," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 287-300.
    8. H. Peyton Young, 1996. "The Economics of Convention," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 105-122, Spring.
    9. Bernard Walliser, 1998. "A spectrum of equilibration processes in game theory," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 67-87.
    10. John Conlisk, 1996. "Why Bounded Rationality?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 669-700, June.
    11. repec:ucp:bkecon:9780226320687 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Arena & Lauren Larrouy, 2015. "The Role of Psychology in Austrian Economics and Game Theory: Subjectivity and Coordination," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-15, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.

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