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Binge Drinking, Antisocial and Unlawful Behaviours, and Beverage Types

Author

Listed:
  • Ou Yang

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Xueyan Zhao

    (Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics, Monash University)

  • Preety Srivastava

    (School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, RMIT University)

Abstract

This paper examines evidence from Australia on the factors associated with binge drinking and several alcohol-related antisocial and unlawful behaviours. In particular, to quantify the negative externalities of excessive alcohol consumption by product type, our primary focus is the link with eleven types of alcoholic beverages. We also examine the role of binge drinking in increasing the likelihood for engaging in these antisocial and unlawful behaviours. We use individual-level data from a national representative survey and a multivariate probit model that allows unobservable factors for all negative behaviours to be correlated. Potential misclassification in the self-reported consumption data is accounted for. Results provide valuable evidence for more effective alcohol taxation as a tool for correcting differentiated negative externalities by beverage type.

Suggested Citation

  • Ou Yang & Xueyan Zhao & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Binge Drinking, Antisocial and Unlawful Behaviours, and Beverage Types," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2015n03, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2015n03
    as

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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2015n03.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Binge drinking; negative externalities; alcohol taxation; multivariate probit; misclassification;

    JEL classification:

    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • K3 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law

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