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Is Learning by Migrating in Megalopolis Really Important?

  • Tomohiro Machikita

This paper examines learning by migrating effects on the productivity of migrants who move to the "megalopolis" from rural areas utilizing the Thailand Labor Force Survey Data. The main contribution of this paper is to develop a simple framework to empirically test for self-selection on the migration decision and learning by migrating. The role of the characteristics of the urban labour market is also examined. In conclusion, we find self-selection effects test (1) positive among new migrants from rural area (i.e. "new entrants" to the urban labour market); and (2) negative among new migrants who move to rural areas (i.e. "new exits" from the urban labour market). These results suggest a natural selection (survival of the fittest) mechanism exists in the urban labour market.

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File URL: http://hi-stat.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/research/discussion/2004/pdf/D04-78.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series with number d04-78.

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Date of creation: Feb 2005
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Handle: RePEc:hst:hstdps:d04-78
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