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How do People Procrastinate to Meet a Deadline?

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  • KAYABA, Yutaka
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    Relying on e-learning data, I report here on an empirical investigation of daily homework progress to assess procrastination among high school students, whose behavior is susceptible to present-bias. The homework entails a non-binding goal for the students. The main findings were as follows: First, the goal encouraged a considerable number of students to study more to achieve it. Second, high achievers procrastinated until close to the deadline, particularly females for Math homework. Finally, a considerable subset of high achievers worked hard at the last minute to meet a non-binding deadline. These findings imply that a non-binding goal strongly motivates such students' self-control in goal achievement; however, the process is one of procrastination, and the deadline prevents further procrastination despite being non-binding.

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/28100/1/070_hiasDP-E-33.pdf
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    Paper provided by Hitotsubashi Institute for Advanced Study, Hitotsubashi University in its series Discussion paper series with number HIAS-E-33.

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    Length: 44 p.
    Date of creation: Sep 2016
    Handle: RePEc:hit:hiasdp:hias-e-33
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