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Privately informed parties and policy divergence

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  • Kikuchi, Kazuya
  • 菊地, 和也

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  • Kikuchi, Kazuya & 菊地, 和也, 2011. "Privately informed parties and policy divergence," Discussion Papers 2011-01, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:econdp:2011-01
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    File URL: https://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/hermes/ir/re/18814/070econDP11-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heidhues, Paul & Lagerlof, Johan, 2003. "Hiding information in electoral competition," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 48-74, January.
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