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User innovation - empirical evidence from Russia

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Zaytseva

    (Centre d'etudes de la vie politique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles)

  • Olga Shuvalova

    () (Research Fellow, Institute for Statistical Studies and Economics of Knowledge, Laboratory for Economics of Innovation)

  • Dirk Meissner

    () (Deputy Head, Laboratory for Science and Technology Studies, Institute for Statistical Studies and Economics of Knowledge, National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

Innovations are commonly seen as resulting from the commercialization of new ideas and technological goods by dedicated organizations, especially firms. This conception is reflected in a producer-oriented approach to science, technology and innovation policy-making (STI). However a new understanding of the role of users within innovation processes is gradually taking shape, with profound policy implications. User innovations are often not based on technological improvement or R&D and remain largely under-estimated. Although there are many case studies of user innovators at the industry level, the role of users is not captured by general statistics on innovation. Up to now the only exception is the empirical evidence-based study of user innovation carried out in the UK in 2009. Recently it was complemented by empirical data from the USA and Japan. The present article aims to contribute to closing the gap of empirical data on user engagement into innovation activities at cross-country level. The analysis is based on the results from a national survey carried out in Russia in 2011. The findings contribute to the better understanding of user innovators profile and of the factors which underpin user innovator activities in the context of emerging economies. The article is organized as follows. The first section reviews the relevant literature on the user innovation concept and the main features of user innovations as compared to producer-generated innovations, as well as on the measurement of user innovators. The second section presents the research methodology and the main empirical results. Finally, the paper discusses some of main analytical and policy implications of the empirical findings

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Zaytseva & Olga Shuvalova & Dirk Meissner, 2013. "User innovation - empirical evidence from Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 08/STI/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:wpbrp08sti2013
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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2013/04/08/1294510119/08STI2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric von Hippel, 1986. "Lead Users: A Source of Novel Product Concepts," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 32(7), pages 791-805, July.
    2. Roel Nahuis & Ellen Moors & Ruud Smits, 2009. "User producer interaction in context: A classification," Innovation Studies Utrecht (ISU) working paper series 09-01, Utrecht University, Department of Innovation Studies, revised Jan 2009.
    3. Luthje, Christian & Herstatt, Cornelius & von Hippel, Eric, 2005. "User-innovators and "local" information: The case of mountain biking," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 951-965, August.
    4. World Bank, 2010. "Innovation Policy : A Guide for Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2460.
    5. Marek Jemala, 2010. "Introduction To Open Technology Innovation Strategies," Acta Oeconomica Pragensia, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(3), pages 3-20.
    6. Harhoff, Dietmar & Henkel, Joachim & von Hippel, Eric, 2003. "Profiting from voluntary information spillovers: how users benefit by freely revealing their innovations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1753-1769, December.
    7. Douthwaite, B. & Keatinge, J. D. H. & Park, J. R., 2001. "Why promising technologies fail: the neglected role of user innovation during adoption," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 819-836, May.
    8. Flanagan, Kieron & Uyarra, Elvira & Laranja, Manuel, 2010. "The ‘policy mix’ for innovation: rethinking innovation policy in a multi-level, multi-actor context," MPRA Paper 23567, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Pierre Barbaroux, 2009. "On the nature and logics of innovation capabilities within knowledge-intensive environments: a case study," Journal of Innovation Economics, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 169-188.
    10. Carliss Y. Baldwin & Eric von Hippel, 2009. "Modeling a Paradigm Shift: From Producer Innovation to User and Open Collaborative Innovation," Harvard Business School Working Papers 10-038, Harvard Business School.
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    Cited by:

    1. Natalia Shmatko, 2013. "Graduates’ Competencies For The Innovation Labour Market," HSE Working papers WP BRP 13/STI/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Elena M. Chernovich & Valentina V. Polyakova, 2014. "Innovative Agency Flow: The Case Of Whitewater Paddling Community," HSE Working papers WP BRP 30/STI/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    User Innovation; Innovation Sources; Open Innovation; Innovation Management; Demand Driven Innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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