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Directed technological change: It's all about knowledge

  • Hart, Rob


    (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

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Directed technological change concerns how stocks of factor-augmenting knowledge evolve relative to each other. In a simple framework we show that relative investment rates depend directly on the relative factor shares, and that the resulting evolution of the economy depends on the substitutability between the factors and the nature of the links between the knowledge stocks. We thus generalize and reinterpret existing results. Furthermore, we propose a novel model of spillovers between stocks of factor-augmenting knowledge which results in multiple equilibria when the factors are substitutes. This may have profound implications for the modelling of technological transitions\m such as from `dirty' to `clean' technology, or from low-skill/low-tech to high-skill/high-tech production systems\m and hence for modelling long-run economic change in general.

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Paper provided by Department Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in its series Working Paper Series with number 2012:02.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: 04 May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:slueko:2012_002
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Box 7013, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: 018-67 1724
Fax: 018-67 3502
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  1. Geir Asheim & Wolfgang Buchholz & Cees Withagen, 2003. "The Hartwick Rule: Myths and Facts," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 25(2), pages 129-150, June.
  2. Daron Acemoglu & Philippe Aghion & Leonardo Bursztyn & David Hemous, 2010. "The Environment and Directed Technical Change," Working Papers 2010.93, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  3. Acemoglu, Daron, 1997. "Why Do New Technologies Complement Skills? Directed Technical Change and Wage Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 1707, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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