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Evidence of Class-size Effects on Bullying in Swedish Schools

Author

Listed:
  • Persson, Mattias

    () (Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics)

  • Svensson, Mikael

    () (Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics)

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the effect of class-size on the prevalence of physical and verbal bullying in Swedish schools. We use self-reported individual level data from approx. 3 100 Swedish adolescents in the 9th grade (aged 15-16) regarding their experience of bullying in the school environment. The data covers 40 schools containing 159 classes. We run probit regressions, school fixed-effects probit regressions controlling for between-school endogeneity, as well as using an instrumental variable approach controlling for between- and within-school endogeneity. The results indicate, giving the same conclusion in all specifications, that bullying is not less or more prevalent in smaller classes. However, there are some results indicating that in smaller classes there is a higher probability that an adolescent self-identifies as a bully.

Suggested Citation

  • Persson, Mattias & Svensson, Mikael, 2010. "Evidence of Class-size Effects on Bullying in Swedish Schools," Working Papers 2010:7, Örebro University, School of Business, revised 09 Nov 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:oruesi:2010_007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2008. "Bullying, education and earnings: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 387-401, August.
    2. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule to Estimate the Effect of Class Size on Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tine Louise Mundbjerg Eriksen & Helena Skyt Nielsen & Marianne Simonsen, 2012. "The Effects of Bullying in Elementary School," Economics Working Papers 2012-16, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bullying; Class-size; School; Adolescents; Sweden;

    JEL classification:

    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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