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Between Malthus and the industrial take-off: regional inequality in Sweden, 1571-1850

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  • Enflo, Kerstin

    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

  • Missiaia, Anna

    (Department of Economic History, Lund University)

Abstract

The causes and extent of regional inequality in the process of economic growth are at the core of historical economic research. So far, much attention has been devoted to studying the role of industrialization in driving regional divergence. But empirical studies on relatively unequal countries such as Italy or Spain show that inequality was already high when their modern industrialization began (Felice, 2011; Rosés et al., 2010). This paper studies the extent and drivers of pre-industrial inequality for the first time with reference to a pre-industrial European economy. Using new estimates of regional GDP for the regions of Sweden for the period 1571-1850 (Enflo and Missiaia, 2017), we find that regional inequality increased dramatically between 1571 and 1750 and stayed high until the mid-19th century. This result discards the view that industrial take-off was the main driver of regional divergence. Decomposing the Theil index for GDP per worker, we find that the bulk of inequality from 1750 onwards was driven by structural differences across sectors rather than different regional productivity within sectors. We then show that counties with higher agricultural productivity followed a classic Malthusian pattern in its population dynamics when experiencing technological advancement, while ones with higher industrial productivity did not. The difference in the two sectors is what boosted pre-industrial regional inequality. We suggest that institutional factors such as the creation of the Swedish Empire, the monopoly trading rights for Stockholm and the protective industrial policy explain this exceptional pattern.

Suggested Citation

  • Enflo, Kerstin & Missiaia, Anna, 2017. "Between Malthus and the industrial take-off: regional inequality in Sweden, 1571-1850," Lund Papers in Economic History 168, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:luekhi:0168
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    Cited by:

    1. Kathryn E. Gary & Cristina Victoria Radu, 2019. "The impact of border changes and protectionism on real wages in early modern Scania," Working Papers 0166, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Gary, Kathryn, 2019. "The distinct seasonality of early modern casual labor and the short durations of individual working years: Sweden 1500-1800," Lund Papers in Economic History 189, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    3. Erik Bengtsson & Mats Olsson & Patrick Svensson, 2022. "Mercantilist inequality: wealth and poverty in Stockholm, 1650–1750†," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 75(1), pages 157-180, February.
    4. Willner, Sam, 2021. "Rural Living Standards and Inequality: A Case Study from Southern Sweden 1780-1919," Lund Papers in Economic History 219, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    regional GDP; Sweden; long-run regional inequality; pre-industrial regional development; Malthusian dynamics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods
    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N93 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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