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Social Capital and the Family: Evidence that Strong Family Ties Cultivate Civic Virtues

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Abstract

I establish a positive relationship between family ties and civic virtues, as captured by disapproval of tax and benefit cheating, corruption, and a range of other dimensions of exploiting others for personal gain. I find that family ties are a complement to social capital, using within country evidence from 83 nations and data on second generation immigrants in 29 countries with ancestry in 85 nations. Strong families cultivate universalist values and produce more civic and altruistic individuals. The results provide a constructive role for families in promoting family values, which challenge an ‘amoral familism.’ Moreover, strong families are complementary with more developed and democratic institutions. The results provide a constructive role for families in promoting family values that support successful societies with a high state and fiscal capacity.

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  • Ljunge, Martin, 2013. "Social Capital and the Family: Evidence that Strong Family Ties Cultivate Civic Virtues," Working Paper Series 967, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:0967
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    11. Martin Ljunge, 2012. "The Spirit of the Welfare State? Adaptation in the Demand for Social Insurance," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 187-223.
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    15. repec:cup:apsrev:v:87:y:1993:i:01:p:1-11_09 is not listed on IDEAS
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    17. repec:hrv:faseco:30752839 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Ang, James B. & Fredriksson, Per G., 2017. "Wheat agriculture and family ties," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 236-256.
    2. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1416-1429 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ljunge, Martin, 2014. "Trust issues: Evidence on the intergenerational trust transmission among children of immigrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 175-196.
    4. Mauro Marè & Antonello Motroni & Francesco Porcelli, 2015. "Family Ties and Underground Economy," Working papers 16, Società Italiana di Economia Pubblica.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family ties; Civic; Family values; Cultural transmission; Altruism; Social capital;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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