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Social Media and Politics in Indonesia

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Abstract

Does social media have the potential to influence the political process more in certain countries? How do political actors and citizens use social media to participate in the political process? This paper analyzes these questions in the context of contemporary Indonesia, a country with a young democracy and a vibrant emerging economy. First, the relationships between traditional and social media and politics are discussed. Then, the current situation in Indonesia’s traditional media industry and how it may have helped drive the popularity of social media in Indonesia is analyzed. Finally, the paper discusses social media in today’s Indonesia and provides examples of how political actors and citizens use social media in the political process.

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  • Johansson, Anders C., 2016. "Social Media and Politics in Indonesia," Stockholm School of Economics Asia Working Paper Series 2016-42, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm China Economic Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hascer:2016-042
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    Cited by:

    1. Johansson, Anders C., 2016. "Tweeting for Power: Social Media and Political Campaigning in Indonesia," Stockholm School of Economics Asia Working Paper Series 2016-43, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm China Economic Research Institute.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indonesia; Social media; Media; Politics; Democratic process; Political process; Media industry;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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