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Household decision making and the influence of spouses’ income, education, and communist party membership: A field experiment in rural China

  • Carlsson, Fredrik

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Martinsson, Peter

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Qin, Ping

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Sutter, Matthias

    ()

    (Department of Public Finance, University of Innsbruck)

We study household decision making in a high-stakes experiment with a random sample of households in rural China. Spouses have to choose between risky lotteries, first separately and then jointly. We find that spouses’ individual risk preferences are more similar the richer the household and the higher the wife’s relative income contribution. A couple’s joint decision is typically determined by the husband, but women who contribute relatively more to the household income, women in high-income households, women with more education than their husbands, and women with communist party membership have a stronger influence on the joint decision.

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Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 356.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 20 Apr 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published as Carlsson, Fredrik, Peter Martinsson, Ping Qin and Matthias Sutter, 'Household decision making and the influence of spouses’ income, education, and communist party membership: A field experiment in rural China' in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 2012, pages 525-536.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0356
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/

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