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Market transition, educational disparities, and family strategies in rural china: New evidence on gender stratification and development

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  • Emily Hannum

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  • Emily Hannum, 2005. "Market transition, educational disparities, and family strategies in rural china: New evidence on gender stratification and development," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(2), pages 275-299, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:2:p:275-299
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2005.0014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zhang, Xiaobo & Kanbur, Ravi, 2005. "Spatial inequality in education and health care in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 189-204.
    2. Cameron, Lisa A & Worswick, Christopher, 2001. "Education Expenditure Responses to Crop Loss in Indonesia: A Gender Bias," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 351-363, January.
    3. Brown, Philip H. & Park, Albert, 2002. "Education and poverty in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 523-541, December.
    4. Colin A. Carter, 1997. "The Urban-Rural Income Gap in China: Implications for Global Food Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1410-1418.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlsson, Fredrik & Martinsson, Peter & Qin, Ping & Sutter, Matthias, 2009. "Household decision making and the influence of spouses’ income, education, and communist party membership: A field experiment in rural China," Working Papers in Economics 356, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Alan de Brauw & John Giles, 2017. "Migrant Opportunity and the Educational Attainment of Youth in Rural China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(1), pages 272-311.
    3. Liu, Kai, 2013. "Health Insurance Coverage for Low-income Households: Consumption Smoothing and Investment," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 16/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    4. Reham Rizk & Hala Abou-Ali, 2016. "Out of Pocket Education Expenditure and Household Budget: Evidence from Arab Countries," Working Papers 996, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2016.
    5. Zheng Mu & Yu Xie, 2016. "'Motherhood penalty' and 'fatherhood premium'? Fertility effects on parents in China," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(47), pages 1373-1410, November.
    6. Fredrik Carlsson & Peter Martinsson & Ping Qin & Matthias Sutter, 2013. "The influence of spouses on household decision making under risk: an experiment in rural China," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(3), pages 383-401, September.
    7. Kim, Sung won & Kim, Edward J. & Wagaman, Amy & Fong, Vanessa L., 2017. "A longitudinal mixed methods study of parents’ socioeconomic status and children’s educational attainment in Dalian City, China," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 111-121.
    8. Zhang, Huafeng, 2014. "The poverty trap of education: Education–poverty connections in Western China," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 47-58.
    9. John Knight & Terry Sicular & Ximing Yue, 2011. "Educational Inequality in China: The Intergenerational Dimension," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 201113, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    10. Felicia Tian, 2013. "Transition to First Marriage in Reform-Era Urban China: The Persistent Effect of Education in a Period of Rapid Social Change," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(4), pages 529-552, August.

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