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The Urban-Rural Income Gap in China: Implications for Global Food Markets

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  • Colin A. Carter

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  • Colin A. Carter, 1997. "The Urban-Rural Income Gap in China: Implications for Global Food Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1410-1418.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:79:y:1997:i:5:p:1410-1418
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1244354
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    Cited by:

    1. Emily Hannum, 2005. "Market transition, educational disparities, and family strategies in rural china: New evidence on gender stratification and development," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(2), pages 275-299, May.
    2. Barnett, William A. & Hu, Mingzhi & Wang, Xue, 2019. "Does the utilization of information communication technology promote entrepreneurship: Evidence from rural China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 12-21.
    3. Wang, Qingbin & Shi, Guanming & Zheng, Yi, 2000. "Changes In Income And Welfare Distribution In Urban China And Implications For Food Consumption And Trade," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21767, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Rozelle, Scott & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2000. "Transition And Agriculture," Working Papers 11948, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    5. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas, 2003. "Labor market distortions and China's WTO accession package:: an applied general equilibrium assessment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 774-794, December.
    6. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas I., 2001. "China'S Accession To The Wto And Impacts On Livestock Trade And Production Patterns," 2001: International Trade in Livestock Products Symposium, January 2001, Auckland, New Zealand 14540, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    7. Liu, Hongbo & Parton, Kevin A. & Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Cox, Rod, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), pages 1-17.
    8. David Holland & Eugenio Figueroa B & Roberto Alvarez & John Gilbert, 2003. "On The Removal of Agricultural Price Bands in Chile: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 244, Central Bank of Chile.
    9. Colin A. Carter & Andrew J. Estrin, 2005. "Opening of China's Trade, Labour Market Reform and Impact on Rural Wages," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(6), pages 823-839, June.
    10. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas I., 2000. "Rural-Urban Migration, Labor Mobility And Agricultural Trade Liberalization In China," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21727, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Rigg, Jonathan, 2006. "Land, farming, livelihoods, and poverty: Rethinking the links in the Rural South," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 180-202, January.
    12. David Holland & Eugenio Figueroa & Roberto Álvarez & John Gilbert, 2005. "Imperfect Labor Mobility, Urban Unemployment and Agricultural Trade Reform in Chile," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Rómulo A. Chumacero & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (S (ed.), General Equilibrium Models for the Chilean Economy, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 11, pages 375-395, Central Bank of Chile.
    13. Hannum, Emily & Wang, Meiyan, 2006. "Geography and educational inequality in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 253-265.
    14. Hongbo Liu & Kevin A. Parton & Zhang-Yue Zhou & Rod Cox, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), pages 485-501, October.

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