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Rural labor migration, characteristics, and employment patterns

Author

Listed:
  • Tuan, Francis
  • Somwaru, Agapi
  • Diao, Xinshen

Abstract

Continued industrialization in China and increase in its agricultural productivity imply that surplus rural workers will to be attracted into non-agricultural production activities and, consequently, will have the opportunity to increase their off-farm income. Studying the structure of the rural labor force and its characteristics is important for evaluating its migration potential into non-agricultural sectors. This study examines the rural labor market in China exclusively based on China's first national agricultural census. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the rural labor force and their association with the type of employment, place of work, and labor migration. Furthermore, we investigated demographic distributions of rural labor force and attempted to capture their relation with the distribution of other resources especially land availability or land constraints. We finally applied a generalized polytomous logit technique to analyze the patterns of rural labor employment and forecast rural migration. In this framework, we related rural labor migration with demographic characteristics, types of occupation, place of work, geographic characteristics, and various economic development indicators.

Suggested Citation

  • Tuan, Francis & Somwaru, Agapi & Diao, Xinshen, 2000. "Rural labor migration, characteristics, and employment patterns," TMD discussion papers 63, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:63
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/tmdp63.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William L. Parish & Xiaoye Zhe & Fang Li, "undated". "Nonfarm Work and Marketization of the Chinese Countryside," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 95-6, Chicago - Population Research Center.
    2. Peter Kennedy, 2003. "A Guide to Econometrics, 5th Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 5, volume 1, number 026261183x, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harris, Rebecca Lee, 2002. "Estimation of a regionalized Mexican Social Accounting Matrix," TMD discussion papers 97, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Wang, Xiaobing & Herzfeld, Thomas & Glauben, Thomas, 2007. "Labor allocation in transition: Evidence from Chinese rural households," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 287-308.
    3. Diao, Xinshen & Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2003. "China's WTO accession: impacts on regional agricultural income-- a multi-region, general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 332-351, June.
    4. Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Wang, Xiaobing, 2008. "Labor market participation of Chinese agricultural households: Empirical evidence from Zhejiang province," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 329-340, August.
    5. Chen, Zhuo & Huffman, Wallace E. & Rozelle, Scott, 2004. "Migration And Local Off-Farm Working In Rural China," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20075, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Wang, Xiaobing, 2005. "Labor Market Participation of Chinese Agricultural Households," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24516, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Calvo, Esteban & Williamson, John B., 2006. "Old-Age Pension Reform and Modernization Pathways: Lessons for China from Latin America," MPRA Paper 4872, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2007.

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