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A Dynamic Tobit Model of Female Labor Supply

Author

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  • Islam, Nizamul

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

A dynamic Tobit model is applied to longitudinal data to estimate the hours of work of married women in Sweden during 1992-2001. Hours of work are found to be negatively related to fertility. Other characteristics of married women are also found to have an effect on labor supply. Inter- temporal labor supply decisions seemed to be characterized by a substantial amount of unobserved heterogeneity, first order state dependence and serially correlated error components. The findings suggest that the first order state dependence and unobserved heterogeneity are very sensitive to the initial condition.

Suggested Citation

  • Islam, Nizamul, 2007. "A Dynamic Tobit Model of Female Labor Supply," Working Papers in Economics 259, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0259
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/4729
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McFadden, Daniel, 1989. "A Method of Simulated Moments for Estimation of Discrete Response Models without Numerical Integration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(5), pages 995-1026, September.
    2. Dean R. Hyslop, 1999. "State Dependence, Serial Correlation and Heterogeneity in Intertemporal Labor Force Participation of Married Women," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1255-1294, November.
    3. Curtis Eberwein & John C. Ham & Robert J. Lalonde, 1997. "The Impact of Being Offered and Receiving Classroom Training on the Employment Histories of Disadvantaged Women: Evidence from Experimental Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 655-682.
    4. Lee, Lung-fei, 1999. "Estimation of dynamic and ARCH Tobit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 355-390, October.
    5. Jorgen Hansen & Magnus Lofstrom, 2009. "The dynamics of immigrant welfare and labor market behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(4), pages 941-970, October.
    6. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1997. "Simulated maximum likelihood estimation of dynamic discrete choice statistical models some Monte Carlo results," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-35.
    7. Blank, Rebecca M., 1989. "Analyzing the length of welfare spells," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 245-273, August.
    8. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-694, July.
    9. Islam, Nizamul, 2005. "Dynamic labour force participation of married women in Sweden," Working Papers in Economics 184, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 10 Jul 2007.
    10. James J. Heckman & Thomas E. Macurdy, 1980. "A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 47-74.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brown, Sarah & Greene, William H. & Harris, Mark N. & Taylor, Karl, 2015. "An inverse hyperbolic sine heteroskedastic latent class panel tobit model: An application to modelling charitable donations," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 228-236.
    2. Wiji Arulampalam & Mark B. Stewart, 2009. "Simplified Implementation of the Heckman Estimator of the Dynamic Probit Model and a Comparison with Alternative Estimators," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(5), pages 659-681, October.
    3. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i::p:86-104 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female labor supply; state dependence; heterogeneity; dynamic Tobit;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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