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Corporate Social Responsibility In Japan: Analyzing The Participating Companies In Global Reporting Initiative




Following the US and Europe, Japan is now becoming aware of the importance of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). In fact, Japan has become the country with the largest number of participants in Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), which is currently the most acknowledged reporting system of CSR in the world. However, the mere number of the participants does not tell much. The Japanese approach to CSR may well differ from the Western approach, given various differences in their socio-economic characteristics. Against this background, two empirical tests are conducted. The identification of the characteristics of the Japanese adopters of GRI Guidelines implies the erosion of the traditional corporate-centered system of that country both from outside and from inside. On the other hand, the manner of adoption is found to be quite different between Japan and the West, which may be a sign of cultural or systematic resistance to total convergence.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzuki, Kenji & Tanimoto, Kanji, 2005. "Corporate Social Responsibility In Japan: Analyzing The Participating Companies In Global Reporting Initiative," EIJS Working Paper Series 208, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0208

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Isabelle Maignan & David A Ralston, 2002. "Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe and the U.S.: Insights from Businesses' Self-presentations," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 33(3), pages 497-514, September.
    2. Catherine M. Paul & Donald Siegel, 2006. "Corporate social responsibility and economic performance," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 207-211, December.
    3. Wokutch, Richard E. & Shepard, Jon M., 1999. "The Maturing of the Japanese Economy: Corporate Social Responsibility Implications," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(03), pages 527-540, July.
    4. Wendy Chapple & Andrew Cooke & Vaughan Galt & David Paton, 2001. "The determinants of voluntary investment decisions," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(8), pages 453-463.
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    1. repec:wsi:rpbfmp:v:20:y:2017:i:01:n:s0219091517500011 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Feng, Zhi-Yuan & Wang, Ming-Long & Huang, Hua-Wei, 2015. "Equity Financing and Social Responsibility: Further International Evidence," The International Journal of Accounting, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 247-280.
    3. Yeh, Shu-Ling & Chen, Yu-Shan & Kao, Yi-Hui & Wu, Sou-Shan, 2014. "Obstacle factors of corporate social responsibility implementation: Empirical evidence from listed companies in Taiwan," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 313-326.

    More about this item


    corporate social responsibility (CSR); global reporting initiative (GRI); international comparison; Japan; system perspective;

    JEL classification:

    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General


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