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Multidimensional global games and some applications

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  • Dzsamila Vonnak

    (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

I extend the standard global games framework by introducing an addition target on which agents can coordinate on. I compare this multidimensional case to the standard global games problem. Furthermore, I investigate the effects of consolidating the multiple targets. I find that introducing an additional option generates a negative strategic correlation between the options and thus weakens the coordination. However, unifying the options eliminates the endogenous correlation and thus restores the coordination. I also show two potential applications to be modeled by these kinds of games.

Suggested Citation

  • Dzsamila Vonnak, 2018. "Multidimensional global games and some applications," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1803, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1803
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    global games; coordination;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations

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