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The Bias of Realized Volatility

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  • Becker, Janis
  • Leschinski, Christian

Abstract

Realized volatility underestimates the variance of daily stock index returns by an average of 14 percent. This is documented for a wide range of international stock indices, using the fact that the average of realized volatility and that of squared returns should be the same over longer time horizons. It is shown that the magnitude of this bias cannot be explained by market microstructure noise. Instead, it can be attributed to correlation between the continuous components of intraday returns and correlation between jumps and previous/subsequent continuous price movements.

Suggested Citation

  • Becker, Janis & Leschinski, Christian, 2018. "The Bias of Realized Volatility," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-642, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  • Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-642
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
    6. Abadir, Karim M. & Distaso, Walter & Giraitis, Liudas, 2009. "Two estimators of the long-run variance: Beyond short memory," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(1), pages 56-70, May.
    7. Robinson Kruse & Christian Leschinski & Michael Will, 2016. "Comparing Predictive Accuracy under Long Memory - With an Application to Volatility Forecasting," CREATES Research Papers 2016-17, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    8. Heejoon Han & Dennis Kristensen, 2014. "Asymptotic Theory for the QMLE in GARCH-X Models With Stationary and Nonstationary Covariates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 416-429, July.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Return Volatility; Realized Volatility; Squared Returns;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G17 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Financial Forecasting and Simulation

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