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Predicting the Equity Market with Option Implied Variables

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  • Prokopczuk, Marcel
  • Tharann, Björn
  • Wese Simen, Chardin

Abstract

We comprehensively analyze the predictive power of several option implied variables for monthly S & P 500 excess returns and realized variance. The correlation risk premium (CRP) emerges as a strong predictor of both excess returns and realized variance. This is true both in- and out-of-sample. A timing strategy based on the CRP leads to utility gains of more than 4.63% per annum. In contrast, the variance risk premium (VRP), which strongly predicts excess returns, does not lead to economic gains.

Suggested Citation

  • Prokopczuk, Marcel & Tharann, Björn & Wese Simen, Chardin, 2017. "Predicting the Equity Market with Option Implied Variables," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-619, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  • Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-619
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Equity Premium; Option Implied Information; Portfolio Choice; Predictability; Timing Strategies;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G17 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Financial Forecasting and Simulation

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