IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

How do SMEs to rise at the top of the supply chain? An econometric exploration of the French auto industry (In French)

  • Vincent FRIGANT (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113)
  • Stéphanie PERES (Bordeaux Sciences Agro, INRA, ISVV, USC 1320 GAIA)
  • Stéphane VIROL (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113)

The modular revolution has transformed the industrial architecture of the automotive supply chain. Now it is conventional to describe it as a narrow pyramid where only mega-suppliers have access to manufacturers. However, some authors show that SME still manage to reach the summit of a pyramid which is less narrow and closed that it is usually presented. In this way, this article proposes a theoretical interpretation of the reasons for SMEs to access the supply pyramid forefront. We defend the thesis that E. Penrose interstices appear in the automotive industry. So SMEs are able to interfere at the highest level of the pyramid and, in future, it is likely to renew. In a second step, we clarify using an ordered probability model what are the characteristics of SMEs according to their rank in the pyramid. We use an unique database. This work allows us to identify the main determinants of the SMEs position in the supply chain.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://cahiersdugretha.u-bordeaux4.fr/2012/2012-16.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée in its series Cahiers du GREThA with number 2012-16.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2012-16
Contact details of provider: Postal: Avenue Léon Duguit, 33608 Pessac Cedex
Phone: +33 (0)5.56.84.25.75
Fax: +33 (0)5.56.84.86.47
Web page: http://gretha.u-bordeaux4.fr/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Vincent Frigant & Damien Talbot, 2005. "Technological Determinism and Modularity: Lessons from a Comparison between Aircraft and Auto Industries in Europe," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 337-355.
  2. Thomas Klier & James Rubenstein, 2008. "Who Really Made Your Car? Restructuring and Geographic change in the Auto Industry," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wrmyc, June.
  3. Richard N. Langlois, 2002. "Modularity in Technology and Organization," Chapters, in: Entrepreneurship and the Firm, chapter 2 Edward Elgar.
  4. Peter Nolan & Jin Zhang & Chunhang Liu, 2008. "The global business revolution, the cascade effect, and the challenge for firms from developing countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 29-47, January.
  5. Maris CORIS (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Vincent FRIGANT (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Jean-Bernard LAYAN (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Damien TALBOT (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113), 2009. "Spatial dynamics of firms (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA 2009-20, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
  6. Ulrich, Karl, 1995. "The role of product architecture in the manufacturing firm," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 419-440, May.
  7. Zvi Griliches, 1990. "Patent Statistics as Economic Indicators: A Survey," NBER Working Papers 3301, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. repec:fth:harver:1473 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Brusoni, Stefano & Prencipe, Andrea, 2001. "Unpacking the Black Box of Modularity: Technologies, Products and Organizations," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 179-205, March.
  10. Carliss Y. Baldwin & Kim B. Clark, 2000. "Design Rules, Volume 1: The Power of Modularity," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262024667, June.
  11. Vincent Frigant, 2005. "Vanishing hand versus Systems integrators - Une revue de la littérature sur l'impact organisationnel de la modularité," Revue d'Économie Industrielle, Programme National Persée, vol. 109(1), pages 29-52.
  12. Vincent FRIGANT (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113), 2011. "Egyptian pyramid or Aztec pyramid: How should we describe the industrial architecture of automotive supply chains in Europe?," Cahiers du GREThA 2011-27, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
  13. Josh Whitford & Aldo Enrietti, 2005. "Surviving the Fall of a King: The Regional Institutional Implications of Crisis at Fiat Auto," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 771-795, December.
  14. Lyra J. Colfer & Carliss Y. Baldwin, 2010. "The Mirroring Hypothesis: Theory, Evidence and Exceptions," Harvard Business School Working Papers 10-058, Harvard Business School, revised Jun 2010.
  15. Timothy J. Sturgeon, 2002. "Modular production networks: a new American model of industrial organization," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 451-496, June.
  16. Richard N. Langlois, 2001. "The Vanishing Hand: the Changing Dynamics of Industrial Capitalism," Economic History 0110001, EconWPA.
  17. Gary Herrigel, 2004. "Emerging Strategies and Forms of Governance in High-Wage Component Manufacturing Regions," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1-2), pages 45-79.
  18. François Fourcade & Christophe Midler, 2005. "The role of 1st tier suppliers in automobile product modularisation: the search for a coherent strategy," Post-Print hal-00262872, HAL.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2012-16. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Emmanuel Petit)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.