IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Crisis and Recovery in Argentina: Labor market, poverty, inequality and pro-poor growth dynamics


  • Melanie Khamis

    () (London School of Economics and Political Science, Development Studies Institute, London)


This paper explores the labor market, poverty, inequality and pro-poor growth dynamics in the recent economic crisis and recovery in Argentina. In the labor market it is possible to see the diverging experience of the economic crisis and recovery. For instance, the unemployed were more likely to find employment in the informal sector than in the formal sector. In terms of economic sectors it seems that certain labor-intensive, dynamic, low-skilled sectors such as manufacturing, other services, construction and retail contributed most to the movement between the different labor force states of employment, unemployment and inactivity. Policy responses in the labor market to poverty and inequality increases from the economic crisis were implemented through government transfers, in particular the workfare program Plan Jefes y Jefas. The pro-poor features of the early economic recovery period were mainly accounted for by these government transfers. However, at later stages of recovery income increases of the poor are less attributed to government transfers and more due to the pro-poor pattern of growth itself.

Suggested Citation

  • Melanie Khamis, 2005. "Crisis and Recovery in Argentina: Labor market, poverty, inequality and pro-poor growth dynamics," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 135, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:got:iaidps:135

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dollar, David & Kraay, Aart, 2002. "Growth Is Good for the Poor," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 195-225, September.
    2. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Walter Sosa Escudero, 2000. "Characterization of inequality changes through microeconometric decompositions. The case of Greater Buenos Aires," Department of Economics, Working Papers 025, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    3. Bosch, Mariano & Maloney, William, 2005. "Labor market dynamics in developing countries: comparative analysis using continuous time Markov processes," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3583, The World Bank.
    4. Ravallion, Martin, 2004. "Pro-poor growth : A primer," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3242, The World Bank.
    5. Ravallion, Martin & Huppi, Monika, 1991. "Measuring Changes in Poverty: A Methodological Case Study of Indonesia during an Adjustment Period," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 5(1), pages 57-82, January.
    6. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
    7. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2003. "Measuring pro-poor growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 93-99, January.
    8. Kraay, Aart, 2006. "When is growth pro-poor? Evidence from a panel of countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 198-227, June.
    9. Emanuela Galasso & Martin Ravallion, 2004. "Social Protection in a Crisis: Argentina's Plan Jefes y Jefas," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(3), pages 367-399.
    10. Lucas Ronconi & Juan Sanguinetti & Sandra Fachelli & Virginia Casazza & Ignacio Franceschelli, 2006. "Poverty and Employability Effects of Workfare Programs in Argentina," Working Papers PMMA 2006-14, PEP-PMMA.
    11. McKenzie, David J, 2004. "Aggregate Shocks and Urban Labor Market Responses: Evidence from Argentina's Financial Crisis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(4), pages 719-758, July.
    12. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4515 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Stephan Klasen & Silke Woltermann, 2005. "The impact of demographic dynamics on economic development, poverty and inequality in Mozambique," Departmental Discussion Papers 126, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Economic crisis and recovery; poverty; informal labor market; workfare programs; Argentina;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • O49 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Other

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:got:iaidps:135. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sabine Jaep). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.