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Econometric Analysis of Impact of Relative Location on the Growth Effects of Economic Integration. The case of the EU

Listed author(s):
  • Tomasz Brodzicki

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Gdansk)

In the paper we construct two novel indices of relative centrality – peripheriality in order to test whether location has an impact on medium and long-run growth rates of the European Union Member States. We utilize two popular econometric approaches – standard cross-sectional growth regressions as well as dynamic panel data models. The study is undertaken for 27 developed economies (15 EU Member States and 12 non-members) within a period 1960 to 1999. In accordance with the new economic geography models (NEG) our results indicate that relative location within large regional integration arrangement such as the European Union could at least to some extent affect growth effects associated with the process of economic integration. Furthermore, the benefits are found to be asymmetrical between the core and peripheral states. These results, however, need further empirical investigation as they are found to be rather sensitive.

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File URL: http://gnu.univ.gda.pl/~keie/ao9.doc
File Function: First version, 2005
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Paper provided by The Univeristy of Gdansk, Faculty of Economics, Economics of European Integration Division in its series Working Papers of Economics of European Integration Division with number 0603.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2005
Date of revision: Jan 2006
Handle: RePEc:gda:wpaper:0603
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Univeristy of Gdansk, Faculty of Economics, ul. Armii Krajowej 119/121, 81-824 Sopot, Poland

Phone: (048) 58 523-13-70
Fax: (048) 58 523-13-70
Web page: http://ekonom.ug.edu.pl/web/keie/index.html?lang=pl

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  1. Brodzicki Tomasz, 2003. "In search for accumulative effects of European economic integration," International Trade 0310006, EconWPA.
  2. Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2002. "EU Expansion and EU Growth," Working Papers 487, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  3. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
  4. Patrick Vanhoudt, 1999. "Did the European unification induce economic growth? In search of scale effects and persistent changes," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 135(2), pages 193-220, June.
  5. Alexander Italianer & Jean Pisani-Ferry, 1994. "Whither the Gains from European Economic Integration ?," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 45(3), pages 689-702.
  6. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
  7. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  8. Michael B. Devereux & Beverly J. Lapham, 1994. "The Stability of Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 299-305.
  9. Diego Puga, 2002. "European regional policies in light of recent location theories," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(4), pages 373-406, October.
  10. Tomasz Brodzicki, 2005. "New empirical insights into the growth effects of economic integration within EU," International Trade 0505014, EconWPA.
  11. Luis A. Rivera-Batiz & Paul M. Romer, 1991. "Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 531-555.
  12. Luis Rivera-Batiz & Paul M. Romer, 1994. "Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth: An Addendum," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 307-308.
  13. Haveman, J.D. & Lei, V. & Netz, J.S., 1998. "International Integration and Growth: a Survey and Empirical Investigation," Papers 98-003, Purdue University, Krannert School of Management - Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER).
  14. Baldwin, Richard E & Forslid, Rikard, 2000. "The Core-Periphery Model and Endogenous Growth: Stabilizing and Destabilizing Integration," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(267), pages 307-324, August.
  15. Baldwin, Richard E, 1992. "Measurable Dynamic Gains from Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 162-174, February.
  16. Henrekson, Magnus & Torstensson, Johan & Torstensson, Rasha, 1997. "Growth effects of European integration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1537-1557, August.
  17. Willenbockel, Dirk, 1998. "Growth effects of anticipated trade liberalization and the Baldwin multiplier," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 231-235, May.
  18. Mazumdar, Joy, 1996. "Do Static Gains from Trade Lead to Medium-Run Growth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(6), pages 1328-1337, December.
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