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The impact of domestic and global trade liberalization on five Southern African countries


  • Wobst, Peter


We compare the impact of alternative domestic and global trade liberalization scenarios on five economies in Southern Africa. The study applies a computable general equilibrium model that employs standardised 12-sector social accounting matrices for Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The approach incorporates stylised features such as own-household consumption and marketing margins that are of particular importance when a majority of agricultural producers are not sufficiently integrated into formal markets and thus rely on own production to meet their daily diets. Hence, improved infrastructure implies lower marketing costs and better market integration, which translates to increased production opportunities. The comparison of the results across all five countries reveals that common policy measures have different impacts depending on the underlying economic structures.

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  • Wobst, Peter, 2002. "The impact of domestic and global trade liberalization on five Southern African countries," TMD discussion papers 92, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:92

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chenery, Hollis B, 1975. "The Structuralist Approach to Development Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 310-316, May.
    2. Löfgren, Hans & Harris, Rebecca Lee & Robinson, Sherman, 2001. "A standard computable general equilibrium (CGE) model in GAMS," TMD discussion papers 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Falvey, Rod & Kim, Cha Dong, 1992. "Timing and Sequencing Issues in Trade Liberalisation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(413), pages 908-924, July.
    4. Paul Winters & Alain De Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Kostas Stamoulis, 1998. "The role of agriculture in economic development: Visible and invisible surplus transfers," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 71-97.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hewitt, Joanna, 2008. "Impact evaluation of research by the International Food Policy Research Institute on agricultural trade liberalization, developing countries, and WTO's Doha negotiations:," Impact assessments 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).


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