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An economic assessment of banana genetic improvement and innovation in the Lake Victoria Region of Uganda and Tanzania:

Author

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  • Smale, Melinda
  • Tushemereirwe, Wilbeforce K.

Abstract

"This research report highlights findings from a set of studies undertaken by applied economists on the impact of improved banana cultivars and recommended management practices in the East African highlands. A particular focus of the analysis is genetic transformation of the cooking banana. Genetic transformation to achieve pest and disease resistance of the cooking banana is a promising strategy for smallholder farmers in this region. Biotic constraints are severe and not easily addressed through conventional breeding techniques or control methods. Exports on the world market are currently negligible, so that the risks of reduced exports due to policies against genetically modified foods are low. The crop is both an important food source and a significant generator of rural income, which means that improving productivity could have great social benefits." from Authors' Summary

Suggested Citation

  • Smale, Melinda & Tushemereirwe, Wilbeforce K., 2007. "An economic assessment of banana genetic improvement and innovation in the Lake Victoria Region of Uganda and Tanzania:," Research reports 155, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:resrep:155
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kikulwe, Enoch M. & Birol, Ekin & Wesseler, Justus & Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin, 2013. "Benefits, costs, and consumer perceptions of the potential introduction of a fungus-resistant banana in Uganda and policy implications," IFPRI book chapters,in: Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara, chapter 4, pages 99-141 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Takashi Yamano, 2008. "Dairy-Banana Integration and Organic Fertilizer Use in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 08-03, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    3. Muto, Megumi & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "The Impact of Mobile Phone Coverage Expansion on Market Participation: Panel Data Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1887-1896, December.
    4. Matthew Schnurr & Sarah Mujabi-Mujuzi, 2014. "“No one asks for a meal they’ve never eaten.” Or, do African farmers want genetically modified crops?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(4), pages 643-648, December.
    5. K. Akankwasa & G.F. Ortmann & E. Wale & W.K. Tushemereirwe, 2013. "Farmers' choice among recently developed hybrid banana varieties in Uganda: A multinomial logit analysis," Agrekon, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 25-51, June.
    6. Langat, B.K. & Ngéno, V.K. & Nyangweso, Philip M. & Mutwol, M. J. & Gohole, L. & Yaninek, S., 2013. "Drivers of Technology Adoption in a Subsistence Economy: The case of Tissue Culture Bananas in Western Kenya," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161444, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    7. Svetlana Edmeades & Daniel J. Phaneuf & Melinda Smale & Mitch Renkow, 2008. "Modelling the Crop Variety Demand of Semi-Subsistence Households: Bananas in Uganda," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(2), pages 329-349, June.
    8. Nassul S. Kabunga & Thomas Dubois & Matin Qaim, 2012. "Yield Effects of Tissue Culture Bananas in Kenya: Accounting for Selection Bias and the Role of Complementary Inputs," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 444-464, June.
    9. Kabunga, Nassul S. & Dubois, Thomas & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "Impact of tissue culture banana technology on farm household income and food security in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 25-34.
    10. Kikulwe, Enoch & Birol, Ekin & Wesseler, Justus & Falck-Zepeda, José, 2009. "A latent class approach to investigating consumer demand for genetically modified staple food in a developing country: The case of GM bananas in Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 938, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Enoch Kikulwe & Ekin Birol & José Falck-Zepeda & Justus Wesseler, 2010. "Rural Consumers’ Preferences for Banana Attributes in Uganda: Is There a Market for GM Staples?," Chapters,in: Choice Experiments in Developing Countries, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Falck-Zepeda, José & Kilkuwe, Enoch & Wesseler, Justus, 2008. "Introducing a genetically modified banana in Uganda: Social benefits, costs, and consumer perceptions," IFPRI discussion papers 767, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Lincoln Addison & Matthew Schnurr, 2016. "Growing burdens? Disease-resistant genetically modified bananas and the potential gendered implications for labor in Uganda," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(4), pages 967-978, December.

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