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Crop production in Ethiopia: Regional patterns and trends

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  • Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum
  • Dorosh, Paul A.
  • Asrat, Sinafikeh

Abstract

Ethiopia’s crop agriculture is complex, involving substantial variation in crops grown across the country’s different regions and ecologies. Five major cereals (teff, wheat, maize, sorghum and barley) are the core of Ethiopia’s agriculture and food economy, accounting for about three-quarters of total area cultivated, 29 percent of agricultural GDP in 2005/06 (14 percent of total GDP) and 64 percent of calories consumed.1 There has been substantial growth in cereals, in terms of area cultivated, yields and production since 2000, but yields are low by international standards and overall production is highly susceptible to weather shocks, particularly droughts. Thus, both raising production levels and reducing its variability are essential aspects of improving food security in Ethiopia, both to help ensure adequate food availability, as well as to increase household incomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Dorosh, Paul A. & Asrat, Sinafikeh, 2011. "Crop production in Ethiopia: Regional patterns and trends," ESSP working papers 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:esspwp:16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Howard, Julie & Crawford, Eric & Kelly, Valerie & Demeke, Mulat & Jeje, Jose Jaime, 2003. "Promoting high-input maize technologies in Africa: the Sasakawa-Global 2000 experience in Ethiopia and Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 335-348, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Minten, Bart & Stifel, David & Tamru, Seneshaw, 2012. "Structural Transformation in Ethiopia: Evidence from Cereal Markets:," ESSP research notes 14, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Abro, Zewdu Ayalew & Alemu, Bamlaku Alamirew & Hanjra, Munir A., 2014. "Policies for Agricultural Productivity Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 461-474.
    3. Desiere, Sam, 2016. "The inverse productivity size relationship: can it be explained by systematic measurement error in self-reported production?," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246971, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    4. Josephson, Anna Leigh & Michler, Jeffrey D., 2015. "To Specialize or Diversify: Agricultural Diversity and Poverty Persistence in Ethiopia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212459, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Lee, Yu Na, 2015. "Effect of Price Risk on Migration: Evidence from Ethiopian Rural Households," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205812, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Husmann, Christine, 0. "Transaction Costs on the Ethiopian Formal Seed Market and Innovations for Encouraging Private Sector Investments," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    7. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Joachim Vandercasteelen & Mekdim Dereje & Bart Minten & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse, 2013. "Scaling-up adoption of improved technologies: The impact of the promotion of row planting on farmers’ teff yields in Ethiopia," LICOS Discussion Papers 34413, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    9. Berhane, Guush & Dercon, Stefan & Hill, Ruth & Taffesse, Alemayehu, 2015. "Formal and informal insurance: experimental evidence from Ethiopia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211331, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Rimhanen, Karoliina & Kahiluoto, Helena, 2014. "Management of harvested C in smallholder mixed farming in Ethiopia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 13-22.
    11. Michler, Jeffrey D. & Josephson, Anna L., 2017. "To Specialize or Diversify: Agricultural Diversity and Poverty Dynamics in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 214-226.

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    Keywords

    Agriculture; Crop production;

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