IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedpwp/16-27.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Identity Theft As A Teachable Moment

Author

Listed:
  • Nathan Blascak
  • Julia S. Cheney
  • Robert M. Hunt
  • Vyacheslav Mikhed
  • Dubravka Ritter
  • Michael Vogan

Abstract

SUPERCEDES 14-28. This paper examines how a negative shock to the security of personal finances due to severe identity theft changes consumer credit behavior. Using a unique data set of linked consumer credit data and alerts indicating identity theft, we show that the immediate effects of fraud on consumers are typically negative, small, and transitory. After those immediate effects fade, identity theft victims experience persistent, positive changes in credit characteristics, including improved risk scores (indicating lower default risk). We argue that these changes are consistent with increased salience of credit file information to the consumer at the time of severe identity theft.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathan Blascak & Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Dubravka Ritter & Michael Vogan, 2016. "Identity Theft As A Teachable Moment," Working Papers 16-27, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:16-27
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.philadelphiafed.org/-/media/frbp/assets/working-papers/2016/wp16-27.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kosse, Anneke, 2013. "Do newspaper articles on card fraud affect debit card usage?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5382-5391.
    2. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    3. Julia S. Cheney, 2003. "Identity theft: a pernicious and costly fraud," Consumer Finance Institute discussion papers 03-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Tal Gross & Matthew J. Notowidigdo & Jialan Wang, 2014. "Liquidity Constraints and Consumer Bankruptcy: Evidence from Tax Rebates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(3), pages 431-443, July.
    5. Victor Stango & Jonathan Zinman, 2014. "Limited and Varying Consumer Attention: Evidence from Shocks to the Salience of Bank Overdraft Fees," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(4), pages 990-1030.
    6. Justin Gallagher, 2014. "Learning about an Infrequent Event: Evidence from Flood Insurance Take-Up in the United States," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 206-233, July.
    7. Nicola Lacetera & Devin G. Pope & Justin R. Sydnor, 2012. "Heuristic Thinking and Limited Attention in the Car Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2206-2236, August.
    8. Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson & Guillermo Moloche & Stephen Weinberg, 2006. "Costly Information Acquisition: Experimental Analysis of a Boundedly Rational Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1043-1068, September.
    9. L. Douglas Smith & Michael Staten & Thomas Eyssell & Maureen Karig & Beth A. Freeborn & Andrea Golden, 2013. "Accuracy of Information Maintained by US Credit Bureaus: Frequency of Errors and Effects on Consumers' Credit Scores," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 588-601, November.
    10. Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Katy Jacob & Richard D. Porter & Bruce J. Summers, 2012. "The efficiency and integrity of payment card systems: industry views on the risks posed by data breaches," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 36(Q IV), pages 130-146.
    11. Julia S. Cheney, 2005. "Identity theft: do definitions still matter?," Consumer Finance Institute discussion papers 05-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    12. Robert B. Avery & Paul S. Calem & Glenn B. Canner, 2004. "Credit report accuracy and access to credit," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), vol. 90(Sum), pages 297-322.
    13. Stefano DellaVigna, 2009. "Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 315-372, June.
    14. David I. Laibson & Xavier Gabaix, 2000. "A Boundedly Rational Decision Algorithm," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 433-438, May.
    15. Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Dubravka Ritter & Michael Vogan, 2014. "Consumer use of fraud alerts and credit freezes: an empirical analysis," Consumer Finance Institute discussion papers 14-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    16. Michael D. Grubb, 2015. "Consumer Inattention and Bill-Shock Regulation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 219-257.
    17. David K. Musto, 2004. "What Happens When Information Leaves a Market? Evidence from Postbankruptcy Consumers," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(4), pages 725-748, October.
    18. Stefano Dellavigna & Joshua M. Pollet, 2009. "Investor Inattention and Friday Earnings Announcements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(2), pages 709-749, April.
    19. Sims, Christopher A., 2003. "Implications of rational inattention," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 665-690, April.
    20. Richard J. Sullivan, 2010. "The changing nature of U.S. card payment fraud: industry and public policy options," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 95(Q II), pages 101-133.
    21. David Hirshleifer & Sonya S. Lim & Siew Hong Teoh, 2011. "Limited Investor Attention and Stock Market Misreactions to Accounting Information," The Review of Asset Pricing Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 35-73.
    22. Donghoon Lee & Wilbert Van der Klaauw, 2010. "An introduction to the FRBNY Consumer Credit Panel," Staff Reports 479, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    23. Joanna Stavins, 2013. "Security of retail payments: the new strategic objective," Public Policy Discussion Paper 13-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    24. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
    25. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2008. "All That Glitters: The Effect of Attention and News on the Buying Behavior of Individual and Institutional Investors," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(2), pages 785-818, April.
    26. David Hirshleifer & Sonya Seongyeon Lim & Siew Hong Teoh, 2009. "Driven to Distraction: Extraneous Events and Underreaction to Earnings News," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(5), pages 2289-2325, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Dubravka Ritter & Michael Vogan, 2014. "Consumer use of fraud alerts and credit freezes: an empirical analysis," Consumer Finance Institute discussion papers 14-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Sarah Miller & Luojia Hu & Robert Kaestner & Bhashkar Mazumder & Ashley Wong, 2021. "The ACA Medicaid Expansion in Michigan and Financial Health," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 40(2), pages 348-375, March.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Nathan Blascak & Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Dubravka Ritter & Michael Vogan, 2020. "Financial Consequences of Identity Theft," Working Papers 20-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Nathan Blascak & Julia S. Cheney & Robert M. Hunt & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Dubravka Ritter & Michael Vogan, 2021. "Financial Consequences of Severe Identity Theft in the U.S," Working Papers 21-41, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    3. Kaufmann, Cornel & Müller, Tobias & Hefti, Andreas & Boes, Stefan, 2018. "Does personalized information improve health plan choices when individuals are distracted?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 197-214.
    4. Xavier Gabaix, 2017. "Behavioral Inattention," NBER Working Papers 24096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ramos, Sofia B. & Latoeiro, Pedro & Veiga, Helena, 2020. "Limited attention, salience of information and stock market activity," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 92-108.
    6. Mikhed, Vyacheslav & Vogan, Michael, 2018. "How data breaches affect consumer credit," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 192-207.
    7. John Gathergood & David Hirshleifer & David Leake & Hiroaki Sakaguchi & Neil Stewart, 2023. "Naïve Buying Diversification and Narrow Framing by Individual Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 78(3), pages 1705-1741, June.
    8. Michaely, Roni & Rubin, Amir & Vedrashko, Alexander, 2016. "Are Friday announcements special? Overcoming selection bias," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 65-85.
    9. Dewan, Ambuj & Neligh, Nathaniel, 2020. "Estimating information cost functions in models of rational inattention," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).
    10. Blankespoor, Elizabeth & deHaan, Ed & Marinovic, Iván, 2020. "Disclosure processing costs, investors’ information choice, and equity market outcomes: A review," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2).
    11. Vyacheslav Mikhed & Michael Vogan, 2017. "How Data Breaches Affect Consumer Credit," Working Papers 17-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    12. Lee, Kuan-Hui & Wang, Shu-Feng, 2023. "Allocation of attention and the delayed reaction of stock returns to liquidity shock: Global evidence," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 421-444.
    13. Goodell, John W. & Kumar, Satish & Li, Xiao & Pattnaik, Debidutta & Sharma, Anuj, 2022. "Foundations and research clusters in investor attention: Evidence from bibliometric and topic modelling analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 511-529.
    14. Huang, Yin-Siang & Bui, Dien Giau & Lin, Chih-Yung & Robin,, 2022. "The effect of abnormal institutional attention on bank loans," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    15. Abeler, Johannes & Huffman, David B. & Raymond, Collin, 2023. "Incentive Complexity, Bounded Rationality and Effort Provision," IZA Discussion Papers 16284, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Johannes Abeler & David Huffman & Colin Raymond, 2023. "Incentive Complexity, Bounded Rationality and Effort Provision," Economics Series Working Papers 1012, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. George Loewenstein & Zachary Wojtowicz, 2023. "The Economics of Attention," CESifo Working Paper Series 10712, CESifo.
    18. Thomas Gilbert & Shimon Kogan & Lars Lochstoer & Ataman Ozyildirim, 2012. "Investor Inattention and the Market Impact of Summary Statistics," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(2), pages 336-350, February.
    19. Stefano DellaVigna, 2009. "Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 315-372, June.
    20. Lin, Mei-Chen & Wu, Chu-Hua & Chiang, Ming-Ti, 2014. "Investor attention and information diffusion from analyst coverage," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 235-246.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    inattention; salience; identity theft; extended fraud alert; risk score; consumer protection; credit reports; Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA);
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D18 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Protection
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:16-27. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Beth Paul (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbphus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.