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Determinants of mortgage default and consumer credit use: the effects of foreclosure laws and foreclosure delays

Author

Listed:
  • Chan, Sewin

    (New York University)

  • Haughwout, Andrew F.

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Hayashi, Andrew

    (University of Virginia)

  • Van der Klaauw, Wilbert

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Abstract

The mortgage default decision is part of a complex household credit management problem. We examine how factors affecting mortgage default spill over to other credit markets. As home equity turns negative, homeowners default on mortgages and HELOCs at higher rates, whereas they prioritize repaying credit cards and auto loans. Larger unused credit card limits intensify the preservation of credit cards over housing debt. Although mortgage non-recourse statutes increase default on all types of housing debt, they reduce credit card defaults. Foreclosure delays increase default rates for both housing and non-housing debts. Our analysis highlights the interconnectedness of debt repayment decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Chan, Sewin & Haughwout, Andrew F. & Hayashi, Andrew & Van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2015. "Determinants of mortgage default and consumer credit use: the effects of foreclosure laws and foreclosure delays," Staff Reports 732, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:732
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerardi, Kristopher & Lambie-Hanson, Lauren & Willen, Paul S., 2013. "Do borrower rights improve borrower outcomes? Evidence from the foreclosure process," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 1-17.
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    3. Chadi S. Abdallah & William D. Lastrapes, 2012. "Home Equity Lending and Retail Spending: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Texas," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 94-125, October.
    4. Rodney Ramcharan & Christopher Crowe, 2013. "The Impact of House Prices on Consumer Credit: Evidence from an Internet Bank," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(6), pages 1085-1115, September.
    5. Cem Demiroglu & Evan Dudley & Christopher M. James, 2014. "State Foreclosure Laws and the Incidence of Mortgage Default," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(1), pages 225-280.
    6. Fredrik Andersson & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Dennis Glennon & Feng Li, 2013. "The Changing Pecking Order of Consumer Defaults," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(2-3), pages 251-275, March.
    7. Ambrose, Brent W & Buttimer, Richard J, Jr & Capone, Charles A, 1997. "Pricing Mortgage Default and Foreclosure Delay," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(3), pages 314-325, August.
    8. Jones, Lawrence D, 1993. "Deficiency Judgments and the Exercise of the Default Option in Home Mortgage Loans," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(1), pages 115-138, April.
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    10. Andra C. Ghent & Marianna Kudlyak, 2011. "Recourse and Residential Mortgage Default: Evidence from US States 1," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(9), pages 3139-3186.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jiang, Helu & Sanchez, Juan M., 2016. "The Dynamics of Mortgage Debt in Default," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 3.
    2. Ricardo Serrano-Padial & Lukasz Drozd, 2015. "Financial Contracting with Enforcement Externalities," 2015 Meeting Papers 1362, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Drozd, Lukasz A. & Serrano-Padial, Ricardo, 2017. "Credit Enforcement Cycles," Working Papers 17-27, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Ron Harris & Asher Meir, 2016. "Recourse Structure of Mortgages: A Comparison between the US and Europe," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 13(4), pages 15-22, 02.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mortgage default; state foreclosure laws; consumer finance;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • K10 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - General (Constitutional Law)

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