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Globalized banks: lending to emerging markets in the crisis

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  • Nicola Cetorelli
  • Linda S. Goldberg

Abstract

As banking has become more globalized, so too have the consequences of shocks originating in home and host markets. Global banks can provide liquidity and risk-sharing opportunities to the host market in the event of adverse host-country shocks, but they can also have profound effects across international markets. Indeed, global banks played a significant role in the transmission of the current crisis to emerging-market economies. Flows between global banks and emerging markets include both cross-border lending, which has long been recognized as responding significantly to shocks at home or abroad, and internal capital-market lending, which is the internal flow of funds within a banking organization (such as between a headquarters and its offices in foreign locations). Adverse liquidity shocks to developed-country banking, such as those that occurred in the United States in 2007 and 2008, have reduced lending in local markets through contractions in cross-border lending to banks and private agents and also through contractions in parent banks' support of foreign affiliates. Because all these forms of transmission impinge on the lending channel in recipient markets, the ownership structure of emerging-market banks does not by itself provide sufficient basis for identifying the degree of shock transmission from abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S. Goldberg, 2009. "Globalized banks: lending to emerging markets in the crisis," Staff Reports 377, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:377
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Temesvary, Judit, 2015. "Foreign activities of U.S. banks since 1997: The roles of regulations and market conditions in crises and normal times," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 202-222.
    2. Domenico Giannone & Michele Lenza & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2011. "Market Freedom and the Global Recession," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(1), pages 111-135, April.
    3. Reza Siregar, 2011. "Macro-Prudential Approaches to Banking Regulation : Perspectives of Selected Asian Central Banks," Macroeconomics Working Papers 23211, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    4. Clarke, George R.G. & Cull, Robert & Kisunko, Gregory, 2012. "External finance and firm survival in the aftermath of the crisis: Evidence from Eastern Europe and Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 372-392.
    5. Košak, Marko & Li, Shaofang & Lončarski, Igor & Marinč, Matej, 2015. "Quality of bank capital and bank lending behavior during the global financial crisis," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 168-183.
    6. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:06:y:2015:i:02:n:s1793993315500076 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Franziska Bremus, 2011. "Financial Integration and Macroeconomic Stability: What Role for Large Banks?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1178, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    8. Temesvary, Judit, 2014. "The determinants of U.S. banks’ international activities," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 233-247.
    9. Reza Siregar & Lim, C.S. Vincent, 2011. "Living with Macro-financial Linkages: Policy Perspectives and Challenges for SEACEN Countries," Staff Papers, South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre, number sp79, April.
    10. Victor Pontines & Reza Siregar, 2011. "Cross-border Bank Lending to Selected SEACEN Economies: An Integrative Report," Staff Papers, South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre, number sp82, April.
    11. Elod Takáts & Agustín Villar, 2011. "International banks, new liquidity rules and monetary policy in EMEs," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Capital flows, commodity price movements and foreign exchange intervention, volume 57, pages 9-35 Bank for International Settlements.
    12. Nkunde Mwase & Francis Y Kumah, 2015. "Revisiting the Concept of Dollarization; The Global Financial Crisis and Dollarization in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 15/12, International Monetary Fund.

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    Keywords

    Globalization ; Banks and banking; International ; Emerging markets ; Liquidity (Economics);

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