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Labor market dynamics with endogenous labor force participation and on-the-job search

  • Didem Tuzemen

Empirical evidence shows that worker flows in the U.S. labor market are very large. Previous studies have mainly focused on documenting and modeling worker flows between employment and unemployment only. However, these studies ignore other important labor flows including movements in and out of the labor force, and worker flows from one job directly to another job. Improving our understanding of this broader set of labor market flows is critical for assessing the merits of labor market policies such as unemployment insurance and minimum wage. ; This paper focuses on the broader set of worker flows. In terms of magnitude, flows into and out of the labor force are as large as flows between employment and unemployment. And worker flows from one job directly to another job, termed job-to-job flows, account for the vast majority of worker separations from employment. More specifically, job-to-job flows constitute almost 40 percent of all separations from employment, and they are twice as large as flows from employment to unemployment. ; The main contribution of this paper is to develop a framework in which labor market flows between employment, unemployment and out of the labor force can be studied. Earlier attempts to incorporate the participation margin in the standard real business cycle framework have been discouraging in the sense that the model generated counterfactual results. This paper presents an alternative general equilibrium real business cycle model that features search and matching frictions, and endogenous labor force participation. The model additionally features on-the-job search to capture job-to-job flows, which are crucial for the U.S. labor market dynamics. The model successfully generates countercyclical unemployment and the negative correlation between unemployment and vacancies, also known as the Beveridge Curve, observed in the data. The business cycle statistics reproduced by the model are in line with their empirical counterparts.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in its series Research Working Paper with number RWP 12-07.

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Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrw:rwp12-07
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  1. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John C. Haltiwanger, 2013. "The Establishment-Level Behavior of Vacancies and Hiring," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 581-622.
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  3. Tripier, Fabien, 2004. "Can the labor market search model explain the fluctuations of allocations of time?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 131-146, January.
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  8. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1994. "Search Unemployment with On-the-Job Search," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 457-75, July.
  9. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  10. Murat Tasci, 2007. "On-the-job search and labor market reallocation," Working Paper 0725, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  11. Mortensen, Dale T & Pissarides, Christopher A, 1994. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 397-415, July.
  12. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Richard Rogerson & Ayşegül Şahin, 2012. "Is Labor Supply Important for Business Cycles?," NBER Working Papers 17779, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Andolfatto, David & Gomme, Paul, 1996. "Unemployment insurance and labor-market activity in Canada," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 47-82, June.
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  15. Robert Shimer, 2007. "Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 13421, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John C. Haltiwanger & Ian Rucker, 2010. "Adjusted Estimates of Worker Flows and Job Openings in JOLTS," NBER Chapters, in: Labor in the New Economy, pages 187-216 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Shi, Shouyong & Wen, Quan, 1999. "Labor market search and the dynamic effects of taxes and subsidies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 457-495, April.
  18. Éva Nagypál, 2006. "On the extent of job-to-job transitions," 2006 Meeting Papers 10, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  19. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, June.
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