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Identifying Foreign Suppliers in U.S. Import Data

Author

Listed:
  • Fariha Kamal
  • Ryan Monarch

Abstract

Relationships between firms and their foreign suppliers are the foundation of international trade, but data limitations and reliability concerns make studying such relationships challenging. We evaluate and enhance supplier information in U.S. import data and present new facts about importer?exporter relationships. Count of foreign exporters from U.S. import data tends to exceed those from source country data, especially from China. The pattern of U.S. imports from origin countries changes substantially by tracing trade back to the supplier's location instead. Related-party relationships trade more, while larger countries have more relationships.

Suggested Citation

  • Fariha Kamal & Ryan Monarch, 2015. "Identifying Foreign Suppliers in U.S. Import Data," International Finance Discussion Papers 1142, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 04 Oct 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1142
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2017.1142r
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandra Bonfiglioli & Rosario Crinò & Gino Gancia, 2019. "Concentration in International Markets: Evidence from US Imports," Working Papers 883, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. Kamal, Fariha & Sundaram, Asha, 2019. "Do institutions determine economic Geography? Evidence from the concentration of foreign suppliers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 89-101.
    3. Sebastian Heise, 2016. "Firm-to-Firm Relationships and Price Rigidity - Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 6226, CESifo.
    4. Tim Schmidt-Eisenlohr & Ryan Monarch, 2015. "Learning and the Value of Relationships in International Trade," 2015 Meeting Papers 668, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Tim Schmidt-Eisenlohr & Ryan Monarch, 2015. "Learning and the Value of Relationships in International Trade," 2015 Meeting Papers 668, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Stephen J. Redding & David E. Weinstein, 2017. "Aggregating from Micro to Macro Patterns of Trade," NBER Working Papers 24051, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Alessandra Bonfiglioli & Rosario Crinò & Gino Gancia, 2018. "Firms and Economic Performance: A View from Trade," Working Papers 1047, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    8. Emek Basker & Fariha Kamal, 2020. "Recall and Response: Relationship Adjustments to Adverse Information Shocks," Working Papers 20-13, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    9. Sebastian Heise, 2019. "Firm-to-Firm Relationships and the Pass-Through of Shocks: Theory and Evidence," Staff Reports 896, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    10. C.J. Krizan & James Tybout & Zi Wang & Yingyan Zhao, 2020. "Are Customs Records Consistent Across Countries? Evidence from the U.S. and Colombia," Working Papers 20-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    11. Ryan Monarch, 2016. "\\"It's Not You, It's Me\\" : Breakups in U.S.-China Trade Relationships," International Finance Discussion Papers 1165, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised May 2016.
    12. Aaron Flaaen, 2017. "The Role of Transfer Prices in Profit-Shifting by U.S. Multinational Firms : Evidence from the 2004 Homeland Investment Act," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-055, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Kamal, Fariha & Sundaram, Asha, 2016. "Buyer–seller relationships in international trade: Do your neighbors matter?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 128-140.
    14. Peter Schott & Justin Pierce & Georg Schaur & Sebastian Heise, 2017. "Trade Policy Uncertainty and the Structure of Supply Chains," 2017 Meeting Papers 788, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    15. Kirill Borusyak & Xavier Jaravel, 2018. "The Distributional Effects of Trade: Theory and Evidence from the United States," 2018 Meeting Papers 284, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Trade; Transactional Relationships;

    JEL classification:

    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade

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