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Wealth, Pensions, Debt, and Savings: Considerations for a Panel Survey

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Abstract

Several U.S. panel surveys measure household wealth. At the same time, many important questions about household wealth accumulation remain somewhat unresolved. We consider whether measurement error on the existing suite of longitudinal surveys hinders their usefulness for addressing these questions. We review the features of wealth data that make it difficult to collect and assess which assets and debts households are more likely to report accurately. We suggest several considerations in choosing between improving existing surveys and starting a new one.

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  • Brian K. Bucks & Karen M. Pence, 2015. "Wealth, Pensions, Debt, and Savings: Considerations for a Panel Survey," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2015-19
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2015.019
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    Keywords

    Measurement error; survey methods; wealth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values

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