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Response bias in survey-based measures of household consumption

Author

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  • Winter, Joachim

Abstract

An important aspect of household surveys is the design of consumption questions. A controlled experiment shows that a single question on total monthly nondurables expenditure and a design with 35 disaggregated categories produce different results. These differences vary with household characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Winter, Joachim, 2003. "Response bias in survey-based measures of household consumption," Munich Reprints in Economics 19725, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19725
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "Asking consumption questions in general purpose surveys," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(491), pages 540-567, November.
    2. Bruce D. Meyer & James X. Sullivan, 2003. "Measuring the Well-Being of the Poor Using Income and Consumption," NBER Working Papers 9760, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Erich Battistin & Raffaele Miniaci & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "What Do We Learn from Recall Consumption Data?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(2).
    4. Winter, Joachim, 0000. "Bracketing effects in categorized survey questions and the measurement of economic quantities," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 02-35, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universit├Ąt Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    5. Michael Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2003. "The Retirement-Consumption Puzzle: Anticipated and Actual Declines in Spending at Retirement," NBER Working Papers 9586, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Winter, Joachim, 0000. "Design effects in survey-based measures of household consumption," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 02-34, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universit├Ąt Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Comerford & Liam Delaney & Colm Harmon, 2009. "Experimental Tests of Survey Responses to Expenditure Questions," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, pages 419-433.
    2. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "Asking consumption questions in general purpose surveys," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(491), pages 540-567, November.
    3. Giuseppe De Luca & Franco Peracchi, 2012. "Estimating Engel curves under unit and item nonresponse," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(7), pages 1076-1099, November.
    4. Hitczenko, Marcin & Tai, Mingzhu, 2014. "Measuring unfamiliar economic concepts: the case of prepaid card adoption," Working Papers 14-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Essig, Lothar, 2005. "Imputing total expenditures from a non-exhaustive list of items : an empirical assessment using the SAVE data set," Papers 05-21, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    6. Pia R. Pinger, 2017. "Thinking about Tomorrow? Predicting Experimental Choice Behavior and Life Outcomes from a Survey Measure of Present Bias," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 935, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Giuseppe De Luca & Franco Peracchi, 2007. "A sample selection model for unit and item nonresponse in cross-sectional surveys," CEIS Research Paper 95, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
    8. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00185 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lothar Essig, 2005. "Imputing total expenditures from a non-exhaustive list of items: An empirical assessment using the SAVE data set," MEA discussion paper series 05081, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    10. Thomas F. Crossley & Joachim K. Winter, 2014. "Asking Households about Expenditures: What Have We Learned?," NBER Chapters,in: Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures, pages 23-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Essig, Lothar, 2005. "Measures for savings and saving rates in the German SAVE data set," Papers 05-20, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    12. Bucks, Brian K. & Pence, Karen M., 2015. "Wealth, Pensions, Debt, and Savings: Considerations for a Panel Survey," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Greene, Claire & O'Brien, Shaun & Schuh, Scott, 2017. "U. S. consumer cash use, 2012 and 2015: an introduction to the Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 17-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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